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Google Mobile First Index 2018: A Simple Guide to Build your Strategy

what-is-mobile-first-index

what-is-mobile-first-index


what-is-mobile-first-index

what-is-mobile-first-index

Google’s mobile first index has created quite an upheaval in the marketing world — and for good reason. If Google is taking mobile websites more seriously, shouldn’t you?

After all, if you want Google to serve up your content to searchers, you need to know how Google crawls and assesses your website. Otherwise, you fall behind the competition.

But don’t panic.

If you don’t have a mobile website ready to go now, you’re not doomed to haunt the 100th page of the Google SERPs forever. In fact, Google is slowly rolling out this new strategy, roping in more websites as time goes on.

If you have a desktop version of your site, you can still get ranked. But at some point, you need to consider the ramifications of not having a mobile-friendly website to serve your visitors.

What is the Mobile First Index?

mobile-first-index

mobile-first-index


mobile-first-index

mobile-first-index

Google’s mobile first index has created quite an upheaval in the marketing world — and for good reason.

If Google is taking mobile websites more seriously, shouldn’t you?

After all, if you want Google to serve up your content to searchers, you need to know how Google crawls and assesses your website. Otherwise, you fall behind the competition.

But don’t panic.

If you don’t have a mobile website ready to go now, you’re not doomed to haunt the 100th page of the Google SERPs forever. In fact, Google is slowly rolling out this new strategy, roping in more websites as time goes on.

If you have a desktop version of your site, you can still get ranked. But at some point, you need to consider the ramifications of not having a mobile-friendly website to serve your visitors.

What is the Mobile First Index?

mobile-first-index

mobile-first-index


mobile-first-index

mobile-first-index

The mobile first index is Google’s way of serving up more relevant search results to mobile users. The search giant has selected a certain number of websites that meet the company’s criteria for mobile-friendly design and using the mobile version of the site to populate the SERPs.

Let’s say that your website was chosen to be involved with the Google mobile first index rollout. You would get an alert in Google Search Console to let you know.

From that point, Google would crawl your mobile site first. It would also display information from the mobile form of your website in the SERPs for searchers to see.

This doesn’t mean your desktop website no longer exists or get crawled. If someone searches for a keyword related to your business on a desktop computer, he or she would still find the desktop version of your site.

In the past, Google only considered a website’s desktop version when ranking and crawling pages. That’s no longer the case. Since mobile users spend two times more minutes online than desktop users, Google understands the need to serve those users better content.

great-content-for-mobile-first-index

great-content-for-mobile-first-index


great-content-for-mobile-first-index

great-content-for-mobile-first-index

But what makes a website mobile friendly? And how do you know if your website is ready for the Google mobile first index? I’m going to cover that and more so you’re ready with a sound strategy.

What Are the Main Changes With the Mobile First Index in 2018?

In March 2018, Google announced the primary change in the mobile first index strategy. Specifically, the search engine will bring in more websites now that the algorithm, bugs, and testing have been ironed out.

If your website isn’t in the first, second, or third wave of this rollout, don’t worry. Remember that Google, as of 2016, had indexed over 130 trillion web pages. That’s a lot. It’ll take time for Google to get to them all.

Additionally, some websites don’t even have mobile versions yet. If your website doesn’t use responsive design or a mobile alternative site, it likely doesn’t render well on mobile screens. You have time to rectify that problem, which I’ll get to later.

The point here is that Google has made some changes regarding how it indexes pages:

  • Distributing as much mobile-friendly content as possible to people on smartphones, tablets, and similar devices
  • For websites in the rollout, Google will display the mobile version of a website if it exists on a separate URL (e.g. m.your site.com instead of yoursite.com)
  • Websites with dynamic serving built in will have their mobile-friendly pages served to mobile users
  • Google will choose mobile-friendly sites over AMP sites.

What Google says about the Mobile First Index

Google has been quick to staunch any panic surrounding its mobile first index. In the short term, at least, it shouldn’t impact your rankings for your existing web pages.

Essentially, Google will be using a bot called a smartphone agent. It will help to identify websites that follow mobile best practices, and are therefore more suitable for the mobile first index.

If you have a desktop site with no mobile alternative, or if your site uses responsive design, there will be no change right now. The same is true if you use canonical AMP.

Additionally, Google claims that the mobile first index — at least for now — has nothing to do with actual ranking. It’s concerned with how Google “collects content.”

For instance, if you have a mobile version of your site or responsive design, your SERP listings will remain the same. Google will pull information from your site just as it always has.

If, however, you have multiple URLs for mobile and desktop, Google will want to serve up the mobile version to smartphone and tablet users. They’ll see the content in the SERPs as defined by the mobile version of your site, such as your headline, URL extension, and meta description.

How to Build a Mobile First Indexing Strategy for Your Website

With all the backstory out of the way, let’s look at how you can prepare a sound strategy for the mobile first index. Preparing ahead can make your site more likely to get listed in the mobile first index. Additionally, you won’t suffer any rankings issues in the future.

Add XML and media sitemaps

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mobile-first-index-xml-sitemap


mobile-first-index-xml-sitemap

mobile-first-index-xml-sitemap

XML and HTML sitemaps have existed for ages. They allow your website to tell Google when you publish new content, which theoretically gets your newest pages indexed faster.

Media sitemaps are the same as XML sitemaps except that they include media other than text, such as images and videos. Many websites have attachment pages that include just the media, and Google can index those, as well, if you choose.

If you’re a WordPress user, the easiest way to generate an XML and media sitemap is to install the Yoast plugin. It automatically creates sitemaps so you don’t have to worry about code or other granular details. Plus, it also includes media sitemaps.

High-quality content

One of the biggest mistakes marketers make when trying to create mobile-friendly websites is disabling certain content on the mobile version. Don’t do that.

Mobile users want just as much information as desktop users. They’re interested in text, images, videos, and other media, so don’t strip them from your mobile site.

Instead, focus on creating the high-quality content every searcher demands. Go in-depth on specific subjects, use media to illustrate your points, and optimize your meta data, which I’ll discuss next.

The mobile first index shouldn’t have any impact on the length or quality of your content. Even the smallest smartphones are large enough to read an article, so don’t deprive those users of your thoughtful prose.

Add optimized metadata

Think of metadata as a way to communicate with users and search engines both. There are many different kinds of metadata, and you need to make sure you’re optimizing the right ones.

First, your titles and meta descriptions should match on mobile and on desktop. These are the two primary pieces of information a searcher sees when landing on a Google SERP.

mobile-first-index-crazyegg-example

mobile-first-index-crazyegg-example


mobile-first-index-crazyegg-example

mobile-first-index-crazyegg-example

If a user searches on mobile, he or she should see the same thing.

Images matter, too. Make sure every image you upload to your site has an alt attribute. It looks like this in the HTML:

<img src=”https://www.xyz.com/picture” alt=”Crazy Egg”>

If you use WordPress, you don’t have to worry about coding. Just click on the image you want to change and select the pencil icon to edit it. You’ll see a form field for ALT text. Fill it in with keyword-rich content.

Set up structured data

Structured data — also called schema markup — helps explain to Google what your website contains. For instance, you can use structured data on a recipe page to communicate the ingredients needed, cooking time, and other information.

Thousands of options for schema markup exist, but you don’t have to use them all. Apply them when they’ll help search engines — and, by extension, Google users — find your content more easily.

You can find tons of information at Schema.org about how to implement structured data and which types will be of most use to you and your website visitors.

The important thing to take away from structured data about the mobile first index is that your schema markup should be the same on both versions of your website. If you have a separate mobile URL, make sure you add the schema markup that exists on your desktop site, and vice versa.

Use expandable content

At one time, “hidden” content was a big SEO no-no. That’s still true for black hatters who want to game the system by keyword-stuffing their articles with text in the same color as the background and other similar tricks.

By the way, they don’t work anymore.

But hidden content can actually help improve your website’s user experience and make your site more mobile friendly. Specifically, I’m talking about expandable content.

You’ve probably seen it on dozens of websites. Some designers and marketers call it accordion content. It’s the type of content that has a headline that you can click on to expand the content further.

If you visit a product page on Lowes.com, for instance, you’ll see a form of expandable content under the product description. There are several blue boxes with icons and headlines.

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mobile-first-index-product-page-form

mobile-first-index-product-page-form

What happens when you click on one of those blue boxes? It expands.

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mobile-first-index-expanded-form


mobile-first-index-expanded-form

mobile-first-index-expanded-form

You can click the minus sign on the right-hand side of the tab you opened to close it.

Why does this matter for the mobile first index?

Think about mobile devices. They’re smaller, and scrolling takes a toll on tired fingers. By introducing expandable content, you reduce the work your visitor needs to do to get the information he or she needs.

Optimize site speed

mobile-first-index-site-speed-optmization

mobile-first-index-site-speed-optmization


mobile-first-index-site-speed-optmization

mobile-first-index-site-speed-optmization

Site speed matters no matter how your website visitors find you or what devices they use. However, it matters even more on mobile.

When people are out and about, they’re often in a hurry. They want the quickest path from their question to a potential answer.

Maybe they’re looking for a place to eat, instructions on how to unclog a toilet, or something else entirely. If the matter’s urgent, they won’t wait for your slow website to load.

Google offers a PageSpeed Insights tool that will tell you how well your website stacks up on both desktop and mobile. Just plug your URL into the box and wait for the answer.

It’ll even tell you what you need to fix to make your site faster.

Work on the user experience on mobile

Try visiting your website on a mobile device. Pretend you’re not the website’s owner, but a potential customer.

Visit several pages. Attempt to use the search feature. Tap the navigation icons or text.

When you find an obstacle, make a note. For instance, navigation links need to be large enough on mobile so that people with larger hands can tap them accurately. If you struggle to tap the right link, you need to make a change in your mobile site’s design.

Use Accelerate Mobile Pages (AMP)

AMP, or accelerated mobile pages, are a way to make your site more accessible to mobile users. If you haven’t set it up yet, now’s the time.

There’s a WordPress AMP plugin that makes creating AMP pages super simple. Just install the plugin and follow the directions.

Google will handle your AMP pages in different ways.

If you have both AMP and non-AMP versions of your website, Google will typically index the mobile-friendly, non-AMP version. It’s just easier that way. That also means Google will be using the non-AMP URL in the SERPs.

Keep in mind, though, that this might change as AMP becomes more sound and more websites use it. Having AMP as an option on your site will set you up for success no matter how Google’s mobile first index changes beyond 2018.

How Google Mobile First Index Can Impact Rankings

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mobile-first-index-ranking-impacts


mobile-first-index-ranking-impacts

mobile-first-index-ranking-impacts

If you’re reading this article because you’re concerned with SEO, your bottom line likely deals without how your website will rank. You want to know if you’ll take a hit if you’re not perfectly set up for the mobile first index.

Do not panic.

As of now, Google isn’t using the mobile first index as a ranking signal. It’s just too early in the game, and since not all websites are part of the mobile first index, it doesn’t make sense for Google to punish those that aren’t included in the program.

First, let’s make one thing clear. Mobile first doesn’t mean mobile only. In other words, even if you don’t have a mobile-friendly version of your site, you can still rank.

However, Google has made clear that it considers its mobile users a top priority. It makes sense for Google to give preference to websites that render properly on mobile versus a site that only has a desktop version.

Many people react to Google’s changes — and often panic. A better approach is to analyze the reasons behind Google’s decisions to figure out where the search engine will go next.

At some point in the future, mobile friendliness will likely have a big impact on rankings. Start preparing for it now.

FAQ About the Mobile First Index 2018

Let’s answer a few of the questions I hear most often about the mobile first index.

Does Google care if you have a mobile site or responsive design?

A mobile site is a separate website designed for mobile users. It typically has an m at the beginning, followed by a period and your URL.

Responsive design is a way to serve up the same website to both desktop and mobile users. It adjusts the design and text to fit the screen size.

Responsive design is likely the way to go because, as mentioned above, Google wants to deliver the same high-quality content to mobile users as to desktop users. If you’re lazy about updating your mobile site, you could slip in the rankings.

However, at this point, it doesn’t matter from a ranking standpoint.

How do I know how Google is indexing my site?

Use the Fetch and Render tool in Google Search Console to check out whether Google is pulling mobile data for the SERPs. Use mobile:smartphone as the user-agent and allow the tool to prepare the batch. If there’s missing content, you need to figure out how to make mobile content accessible.

How will Google get their ranking signals?

Google will continue to get ranking signals from desktop websites that don’t have a mobile version, responsive design, or AMP. Websites that are mobile-friendly, however, will provide their ranking signals from their mobile sites.

Conclusion

The mobile first index is no reason to panic. It’s only just now rolling out in a broad way, and many sites aren’t affected by it yet.

However, it’s a good indicator of what’s to come. Google wants high-quality content. It also wants websites that look good on mobile devices.

With that in mind, continually improve the user experience on mobile so your website visitors don’t encounter any obstacles.

Courier-Journal – 2018 Dainty Contest

Supriya Sridhar, Louisville Courier JournalPublished 7:34 p.m. ET July 30, 2018Updated 10:03 a.m. ET Aug. 1, 2018

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect the correct spelling of Hauck’s Handy Store and the name of Lynn Hauck Hite. 

Salt and pepper hair and brightly colored lawn chairs lined the streets surrounding Hauck’s Handy Store on Monday evening, as those 45 years and older signed up to compete in the annual World Championship Dainty Contest.

Using a 3-foot broom handle, competitors try to pop up and hit the small wooden peg. They get three shots to try to hit it as far down George Hauck Way as they can.

The street game was created by German immigrants in the 1800s. It was brought to Schnitzelburg in 1971 by George Hauck, who created the game to bring the community closer together. And proceeds go to the Little Sisters of the Poor.

Old swing tunes spread around the streets. Standing under the Hauck’s Handy Store sign, Lynn Hauck Hite, George Hauck’s daughter, runs around gathering beer tickets selling icy drinks from the storefront.

“It always meant a lot to dad and all of us,” she said.

Hauck, 98, was unable to make the event this year. However, his daughter, Lynn, and other Dainty veterans are continuing the tradition.

Gary Allen wears a neon yellow T-shirt and clutches a microphone in his hand. The 66-year-old has been organizing the event for 13 years.

When he began, there were nearly 300 people in attendance. Today the event has grown to close to 500.

One of those attendees is Mike McDermott, 39. He sits in a lawn chair along the side of the road with his mother, Pat.

Watching participants prepare, he smiles.

“It’s not as easy as it looks,” McDermott said.

McDermott has been coming to the event for nearly 30 years now. It’s a tradition for him. He’s seen people who are freshly 45 and 80-year-olds participate in some friendly competition.

Sister Michele and Mary Schmidt laugh as excitement amongst watchers grows. Sister Michele lives in the area and has been coming to the event for five years.

“There’s nothing like this,” she said, lips spreading into a grin.

As drops of rain begin to splatter amongst the crowd, attendees pull out umbrellas and pull up hoods, unfazed by the weather.

Old friends, local dignitaries and young onlookers hug and laugh as one by one players strike out. They cheer as a sudden hit sends a peg flying through the air.

Gary Allen speaks into the mic, calling contestants up, one more excited than the next.

“Every year someone says I can’t wait to be 45,” he said.

Reach Supriya at 502-582-4078 or [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @Supriyasridhar_. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: cjky.it/subscribe

Judge Sean Delahanty

JCTA, JCPS Teachers Union, Endorses Sean Delahanty for District Court Judge

Better Schools Kentucky, the political organization of the Jefferson County Teachers (JCTA) has endorsed your [Sean Delahanty’s] election campaign for Jefferson County District Court Judge, 30th District, Division 6.

Judge Sean Delahanty is humbled to have the endorsement of the largest educational political organization in Louisville, KY.
Better Schools Kentucky is a political action committee made up of Kentucky teachers. They seek to support pro-public education candidates who will promote what is best for children and public education throughout the Commonwealth.
The Better Schools Kentucky Committee evaluates incumbents’ voting records on public education issues, interviews candidates, and reviews candidates’ answers to written questionnaires. After considering all of this information, the Committee recommends candidates who are strong advocates for children, teachers and public education; candidates who will listen to the concerns of classroom teachers; and candidates who feel, as they do, that teachers and public schools are important.

The PDF endorsement letter is viewable at the bottom of this page.
Louisville’s Sean Delahanty understands that free public education for all students in Louisville, KY is essential to the growth and prosperity of the entire community.  While there are challenges in any community, Delahanty is proud of Louisville’s educational system.  Delahanty is a native Louisvillian.  Judge Delahanty believes his local education and his teachers were an impactful force leading to his career in law.  This community should lead the advocacy, education and curriculum of it’s schools.

BSK Represents JCTA

JCTA was first established in 1968. Over thirty-five years later they are the recognized bargaining agent for over 6,000 certified personnel employed by Jefferson County Public Schools. They represent teachers, librarians, speech clinicians, physical therapists and occupational therapists in every one of the public schools in Jefferson County.
JCTA’s mission is to serve as the active voice of their members; promote quality and equity in public schools; expand and protect the rights and interests of their members; and advocate human, civil and economic rights for all.
better-schools-endorsement-1-2

Judge Sean Delahanty

Is Marketing Automation As Intimidating As It Sounds?

marketing-automation

marketing-automation


marketing-automation

marketing-automation

If you are involved in any form of digital marketing, then you know that marketing automation is changing the rules of the game.

Figures show that, on average, 49% of businesses are already using marketing automation, and more than 55% of B2B companies have adopted automation technologies.

Based on a study by Regalix, businesses most commonly employ automation in:

  • email marketing
  • lead nurturing
  • software integrations of systems such as CRM, mobile, and social media.

Such activities are driving up sales productivity by as much as 14.5% and reducing marketing overhead by 12.2%.

Imagine setting up customer journeys in your email marketing automation software. All actions are automatically triggered and executed, relieving you of any worries about manually nurturing prospects and leading them down the conversion path.

Automation has made marketing faster, easier and more efficient than ever before.

marketing-automation-easy

marketing-automation-easy


marketing-automation-easy

marketing-automation-easy

Sounds fantastic, but what exactly is marketing automation, what can it do for your business, and how hard is it to master?

Today we’re going to cover the use cases for marketing automation, and how your business can benefit.

Along the way, we’ll provide plenty of examples that you can draw inspiration from. Let’s get started!

What Are the Goals of Marketing Automation?

By definition, marketing automation refers to the use of software to automate manual marketing processes. This includes repetitive tasks such as sending emails, qualifying website leads, social media posting, and more.

Just like any other marketing technique, marketing automation came to be and has gained acceptance because it helps companies and organizations attain certain business goals, the most important of which are:

  • To generate qualified sales leads
  • To convert qualified sales leads into profitable customers
  • To increase the lifetime value of your customers through customer retention

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marketing-automation-lifetime-value


marketing-automation-lifetime-value

marketing-automation-lifetime-value

Converting qualified sales leads into profitable customers is often a central focus for many businesses, because it is easy to track and ties directly to revenue.

It’s important to note that the term “conversion” can mean many things depending on your business model and objectives, such as an inquiry, a purchase or a client setting up an appointment.

Marketing Automation is Part of the Bigger Picture

You might be thinking that the goals of marketing automation seem to be one and the same as the goals of your other marketing efforts. Of course, you are right, even more so because marketing automation does not exist in a vacuum.

Automation is tightly connected to other aspects of your digital marketing program, e.g. your website, landing pages and email campaigns.

how-marketing-automation-works

how-marketing-automation-works


how-marketing-automation-works

how-marketing-automation-works

Consequently, honing these other digital marketing venues is an integral part of implementing automation successfully.

So, let’s take a step back and look first at things you can do to optimize your website for conversions in general, and, specifically in anticipation of adding automation to your marketing funnel.

How to Optimize Your Website for Conversions

Marketing automation can significantly up the number of visitors to your website. However, while elevated traffic is great, it isn’t very useful if visitors do not convert. It’s your responsibility to make sure that your website has what it takes to convince visitors to take action.

Here are a number of strategies you can implement to help optimize your website for higher conversion rates:

  • Ensure fast page loads

Your website visitors are busy people, and a page that is slow to load can be a major turn off and even drive visitors away. So regularly check your page load times to make sure they’re quick.

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marketing-automation-loading-time


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marketing-automation-loading-time

  • Use less elements

Overfilling a web-page with images and text not only slows loading time, but too many elements can also confuse and distract visitors from the conversion path you designed for them. Keep your customers engaged with limited, yet powerful images and copy to avoid overwhelming visitors.

  • Strategically place conversion elements

Your call to action, sign up forms and other conversion elements should be placed above the fold so that visitors can find them right away. Remember, not all visitors scroll down your page.

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marketing-automation-example


marketing-automation-example

marketing-automation-example

  • Communicate what’s in it for them

Be straightforward about the benefits of your product or service and how exactly it can help your customers address the challenges they face.

  • Use action words

Encourage your visitors to act with stimulating verbs in your calls to action. Experiment with your CTAs to know which phrase or words work best. Depending on your goal, you can use “Inquire here,” “Reserve now,” or “Buy now.”

  • Ask for limited information

Not all visitors are comfortable with providing large amounts of personal information. They don’t believe it’s worth it. Limit your request to a few important data points such as name and occupation. You can always send a survey email to gather further details.

  • Add testimonials and reviews

Testimonials and positive reviews provide social proof, helping you to establish credibility. Use these eloquent words from your existing customers to build confidence and trust amongst visitors to your site.

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marketing-automation-slack

marketing-automation-slack

  • Show off your social media follower and subscriber counts

If you have already built a relatively large community for your brand, use this as further social evidence of your reputation.

Every now and then, change your CTA to test whether it improves your conversion rate . A few CTA elements that you can try out are color, copy, placement, and size.

Marketing Automation Strategies that Increase Conversion Rates

Once your website is optimized, it’s time to set up funnels and customer journeys in your marketing automation software to attract people and convert them into paying customers.

Start with the following tips for guaranteed results.

Hyper-personalize your emails

Email personalization is so effective that it would be a fallacy not to use it. Here are a few examples of strategies that you can follow when personalizing your emails:

  • Start with the first thing recipients read – the subject line. It is well documented, for instance, that addressing recipients by their first names can make a big difference.
  • Leverage customer data such as demographics, past purchases and online behavior to offer the right products and services.
  • Send offers based on recipient locations.
  • Limit yourself to two or three instances of personalization per email, else it might seem creepy to your recipients.
  • Use dynamic content so that recipients see only images that are relevant to their interests.

Here’s a sample of personalized, dynamic, gender based email content by Adidas:

Marketing-automation-adidas

Marketing-automation-adidas


Marketing-automation-adidas

Marketing-automation-adidas

Segment your mailing list

Gone are the days of one-size-fits-all emails. Today, using segmentation to target the right audience with the right email is not only recommended, but a must. Statistics show that segmented email campaigns have 14.32% higher open rates and 100.95% higher click-through rates.

Email list segmentation best practices:

  • Create a “new subscriber” mailing list and and send a series of welcome emails.
  • Segment your contacts by demographics, such as age, gender and location.
  • Check the interests and preferences of your customers based on their email history, website activity, and online behavior, and use this information to send them relevant offers.
  • Group contacts who are listed as being from the same location, so that you can send them location-based offers.
  • Segment customers based on the level of their engagement. Send highly engaged customers more promotional emails, while adding lapsed customers to your re-engagement email campaigns.
  • Segment contacts by purchase amounts, allowing you to offer them up-sell and cross-sell opportunities that make sense.

Set up active triggers

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marketing-automation-triggers

marketing-automation-triggers

One of the marvels of marketing automation is that it lets you (instantly) respond to your customers’ behavior. This is made possible through triggers.

Triggers are conditions that kick off automations. These conditions embody your own pre-determined criteria and follow if-then logic, e.g. “If a visitor clicks on a product, send them special offers for related products.”

Marketing automation triggers increase the relevancy and immediacy of your marketing emails and messages because they are directly associated with actions customers take when viewing one of your digital assets.

With triggers you can take a variety of responsive actions, such as:

  • Sending a welcome note each time a visitor subscribes to receive your emails.
  • Displaying a confirmation message or deploying an email each time a customer makes a purchase.
  • Emailing a thank you note every time a visitor downloads a promotional offer.
  • Reminding customers who abandoned their shopping cart to complete their transactions.
  • Emailing visitors who visit a certain page often, as frequent visits could indicate interest or greater intent to buy.

Integrate multiple platforms

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marketing-automation-integrations


marketing-automation-integrations

marketing-automation-integrations

You are likely familiar with omnichannel marketing, which states (the obvious) that marketers now need to provide a seamless experience, regardless of channel or device.

Here are a few suggestions for integrating different digital venues and tools into a single, unified marketing approach:

  • Integrate email campaigns and newsletters into your marketing automations to send recipients more relevant and timely communications. Automating emails is so fundamental that progressive email marketing platforms double up as marketing automation software.
  • Integrate your CRM system with your marketing automation software to help organize and centralize your customer data and to get more out of it.
  • Integrate social media to nurture and convert leads gained from the various social platforms you have a presence on. Doing so will also allow you to target customers and subscribers on Facebook, LinkedIn and other platforms, with social media ads.
  • Integrate your website and landing pages to leverage your customers’ website behavior and activities in your marketing automation strategies. This is also quite common, such that automation software will often include a landing page builder component.

Create workflows

Automation workflows let you weave everything together and precisely plan automated customer journeys. Through workflows, you can automate a series of actions that are triggered when:

  • Certain pre-determined conditions are met
  • A user’s contact information fits a particular profile
  • Customers behave in a specific fashion.

Such workflows make it easier to execute lead nurturing tasks, strengthen customer relationships, and encourage repeat purchases.

Here are a few ideas for workflows that you can set up in your marketing automation software:

  • Welcome workflow: Set up a welcome email workflow for new subscribers, encouraging them to make their first purchase.
  • Post-purchase workflow: Ask for reviews, testimonials, and feedback via email surveys.
  • Re-engagement workflow: Bring back lapsed customers with a workflow that sends a series of re-engagement emails.
  • Loyalty program: Strengthen your loyalty program with a workflow that offers rewards, privileges and exclusive discounts, which can encourage additional purchases.
  • Content workflow. Send email subscribers relevant content to encourage them to send an inquiry or make a purchase.

Take a peek at the following image to see how easy it is can be to create a workflow with the right marketing automation software:

marketing-automation-workflow

marketing-automation-workflow


marketing-automation-workflow

marketing-automation-workflow

Use a lead scoring system

Lead scoring is often considered the best way to gauge whether leads are sales-ready or not. In fact, 68% of highly effective and efficient marketers said that lead scoring is their top revenue contributor.

In lead scoring, you are basically grading your leads’ email and website activities by assigning a score to every action they take, such as visiting a product page or clicking on a CTA. Once a lead reaches a score threshold (for instance, 20), they will be turned over to the sales team to try and close a transaction.

Score your leads like a pro with the following tips:

    • Establish a scoring threshold that will automatically alert the sales team to leads that are ready for sales.
    • Never assign the same score to all actions. High-value actions such as visiting your pricing page or contact-us page must have higher scores than lower-value actions (like opening an email).
  • Score leads based on:
    • Pages visited
    • Number of visits
    • Email opens
    • Email engagement
    • Links clicked
    • Blog posts read
    • Downloads
    • Website session duration
    • Social media activity

Measuring the Success of Your Marketing Automation Strategy

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marketing-automation-campaign

marketing-automation-campaign

Measuring performance is essential; it helps you identify effective strategies and weak spots to improve on.

Of course, for your measurements to be effective, the way you measure your marketing automation performance must be aligned with your automation goals. At the outset of this post, we identified the three primary goals of marketing automation – lead generation, sales, and customer retention.

Here are the top metrics you should always monitor to check if you are on the right track, in relationship to these three goals:

Lead Generation Metrics

  • Lead Conversion Rate: Since the goal of lead generation is to convert visitors into leads, conversion rate, in this case, refers to the percentage of leads acquired in relationship to total website visitors. Lead generation could occur through subscription forms or contact-us forms.
  • Cost Per Lead: This metric tells you how cost-effective your marketing automation campaigns are in acquiring new leads. To calculate this, divide your total marketing spend by your total new leads.

Sales Metrics

Sales Conversion Rate: This is the percentage of leads your sales team is able to convert into paying customers, from your pool of qualified leads. To calculate this, divide the number of leads converted into sales by the number of sales qualified leads, and then multiply by 100.

Revenue Metrics

Revenue growth: Tells you how much your marketing automation campaigns have contributed to growing your total revenue. This allows you to get a big picture perspective of your automation efforts.

Average Order Value: This refers to the average dollar amount spent every time a customer places an order or makes a purchase. To calculate this, divide total revenue by the number of orders.

Cost per Acquisition: This metric shows you how much you are spending to acquire a single paying customer.

marketing-automation-reports

marketing-automation-reports


marketing-automation-reports

marketing-automation-reports

Metrics to Gauge Customer Retention

Customer Retention Rate: This metric tells you the percentage of customers who come back to your store or site, to buy again, after their initial purchase. Of course, the way you measure this must be aligned with your business model and the nature of your products.

Lifetime Value per Customer: When customers keep coming back, this metric gives you an idea of how valuable each customer is to your business in the long run. You can use lifetime value per customer to determine a budget for customer retention strategies such as coupons or exclusive discounts.

Conclusion

Marketing automation may sound complex, but it’s well worth the effort to learn and implement.

With the right goals and strategies, you can easily increase your website conversions and grow your business, while doing away with cumbersome manual processes.

Author Bio

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marketing-automation-author-bio-picture


marketing-automation-author-bio-picture

marketing-automation-author-bio-picture

Kimberly Maceda is a Content Writer for ActiveTrail. She writes for top online marketing sites and provides blogging advice on email marketing and marketing automation. ActiveTrail is a leading provider of professional-grade email marketing and automation software for growing businesses.

Campaign, Candidate And Political SEO: Optimize Or Be Trumped

I say be “Trumped” because for all that he did wrong in tarditional campaigning, he did Political SEO better than anyone had before.

I’ve always been a political guy.  I love using technology to those political ends.  Earlier this year I was able to leverage my experience in SEO, Adwords, cloud computing, data analysis and web design for a political candidate. It’s why these unique products are bundled into what I offer through Upwork.  Today there is no excuse for a candidate to neglect digital media needs.  Local candidates can easily benefit from a solid online presence for much less than they might think.  The past experience with Brent Ackerson’s campaign was very encouraging.

I’ve started to reposition satellite sites made in March for a new project I’ll mention below.  VoteLouisville.com for instance is intended to be a voter education site for anyone who wants to post I just so happen to post all of the stuff there.  I have some further plans for louisvilleelection.com but those are all in my head.

All of these sites are hosted by my Google and Amazon cloud accounts, so that stuff has come in handy.  I hope to attract additional campaign work if not in 2018 by 2020.  I figured this new niche deserved a site so I’m working on candidateseo.com with a handful of .net names also headed there just for ease of use.

Candidate SEO

Candidate SEO

I said at the a campaign meeting that I felt radio and TV ads were as effective as yelling out a window.  I still feel that way, even more so each day.  In these meetings people point out I’m tech savy but others still watch TV … then I think of my 88 and 92 yr old grandparents who recently decided Netflix, Amazon and Hulu were all they needed.

My Grandmother is the idea focus for a campaign, everyone knows older people vote much more regularly and reliably than younger people. She has 29 children, grand children and great grand children.  Living in half a dozen states I think now.  Guess what that means…she’s on Digital mediums 29 times the amount you’d probably expect.

I’ve also explained to candidates that it is a growing trend for a voter to arrive on election day with one or two races already decided.  This voter is now faced with several other races on the same ballot and will likely reach for their phone and decide who to vote for with only minutes of searching for the office or candidates.  The results of these searches will ultimately decide these votes.  Interestingly the money needed for Political SEO and Campaign Site Digital Marketing, creating content with the candidate amounts to a fraction of what campaigns will spend on radio.

I’ve added Candidate SEO to my domain family because I figured I needed a site as unique as this niche.

Position, Position, Position Its Up To Campaign SEO

Real estate brokers say location, location, location.  Did you know that first position in Google search results gets about 35% of users focus but 3rd gets some where around 7%?  If one candidate SEOs their site and a negative site against the other unprepared candidate that could be the election.

Sean Delahanty

Sean Delahanty

I’ll be focused these next months on politics and SEO again.  I’m excited that Judge Sean Delahanty has signed on board with me to help him get out his digital message.  I’ve only had a couple weeks to put into this but check out his new campaign site. There is method to the madness, Ive also create a sister site that serves as a funnel or over flow thats officially the campaign committee‘s site.

I dont want to give away much during a race, but when we search Sean’s name its already number one on Bing and Yahoo.  Google of course is the goal, and we are climbing … as an army of pages are indexing daily.  Last search I found 73 pages indexed for the site each with their own distinct keywords all climbing in ranking.   UPDATE:  Its 146 pages now … on one domain mind you, that started less than a month ago.  The social media presence is expansive, Ive left off some sites from this social media collage.

Social Media – Candidate SEO – “You’re going to be popularrr”

 Sean Delahanty Social Media

Most of you will look at this wall of profiles and think to yourself who is ever going to go to these?  If you did and you’re running for office send me an email…you need me.  These sites aren’t REALLY there to be read by people.  All of these sites are visited by search engines and these sites frame an image of a candidate to Google. All of these social media accounts ultimately end up at the campaign site, there is value in reaching voters … but you’ll reach voters if you are at the top of their searches.

I’ll post shortly about the positioning the sites are reaching.  If you are running for office in Louisville Kentucky and looking for what you dont know you need reach out to me.  Not convinced you need me?  What would you say is the least important phrase for me to ranking these pages for on Google?  If you aren’t thinking the candidates name you should email me.  I’ll explain after the election or ya best ask in person.

Future post I’ll explain why IP based Digital Marketing is so 2001!  Don’t do it…its technically and human behaviorally flawed.

Just in case anyone was worried I have not disclosed anything that someone can learn within a little bit of research concerning my candidate’s sites. All the secret sauce is still in the bottle.

Campaign, Candidate And Political SEO: Optimize Or Be Trumped

Where to Place Customer Testimonials On a Website

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customer-testimonials

customer-testimonials

Consumers have become increasingly blind to marketing and advertising company. The buyer’s journey gets longer and longer, and people are slower to trust companies. What’s a business to do?

Build credibility. And it starts with customer testimonials.

Imagine that someone is looking for a product you sell. He calls a friend and asks for a recommendation. The friend suggests your product.

That person buys from you based on the referral.

Customer testimonials work the same way. Instead of communication between friends, it’s communication from one customer to the masses.

There are two types of customer testimonials.

One is user-generated content. The customer posts a blog article or social update and mentions how much he or she loves your product.

The second is solicited. You ask the customer what he or she thinks, and the customer obliges.

Both forms of customer testimonials are powerful. But where should you put them on your website? And how can they really help your business?

What Is a Customer Testimonial on a Website?

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what-is-customer-testimonials


what-is-customer-testimonials

what-is-customer-testimonials

A customer testimonial is an unbiased, positive review of your product, service or business. The customer has bought from you in the past and sends you a glowing statement of adoration.

When you post that testimonial on your website, it becomes public. Anyone who’s considering a purchase can read it and judge its value.

You can see an example on my agency’s site, Neil Patel Digital.

customer-testimonials-neil-patel-digital

customer-testimonials-neil-patel-digital


customer-testimonials-neil-patel-digital

customer-testimonials-neil-patel-digital

Yes, Google really said that. But you don’t need customer testimonials from a huge corporation to benefit from them.

Customer testimonials can be short, like the one above, or much longer. Some companies post video testimonials, which can prove highly persuasive, and many use photographs of the customer alongside his or her quote.

Remember: You’re establishing credibility. Anyone can make up a glowing quote and attribute it to “Amy S.” If you can supply the customer’s full name, a link to his or her website, information about the customer’s job title, and other identifying data, the credibility factor increases.

Why Are Testimonials So Important?

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importance-of-customer-testimonials


importance-of-customer-testimonials

importance-of-customer-testimonials

One study found that using customer testimonials resulted in a 62 percent increase in revenue per customer. Would you like to boost your revenue by that margin? I know I would.

It’s the recommendation that helps encourage people to buy your product or invest in your service. They know from customer testimonials that other people have tried it. Not only that, but they’re raving about it.

There are two primary principles in play here.

For one thing, people don’t like to be first — unless, of course, they’re in line to buy the latest iPhone. Think about it. If a customer is asked to try a new medication, he or she will likely ask how many others have taken it and whether it worked. Nobody wants to be a guinea pig.

Being first is inherently risky. Since the customer doesn’t know about others’ experiences, he or she lacks a frame of reference except what the company says about its product or service.

And what business owner tells customers that a product is cheap, faulty, inaccurate, or ineffective? Exactly none.

The second principle in play is the fear of missing out — what the Millennials are calling FOMO. Trust me, it’s a real thing.

It’s why urgency and scarcity work so well in marketing. Consumers see that they only have a small window of opportunity to take advantage of an offer, so they seize it.

The same goes for customer testimonials. A person lands on your website and sees three glowing reviews of your flagship product. He or she thinks, “These people are benefiting from the product. Why should I miss out?”

If you can leverage human psychology and behavior for your business, why not take advantage? As long as you solicit legitimate customer testimonials, you’re on the white-hat side of the marketing game.

Where Should You Place Customer Testimonials on a Website?

When deciding where to put customer testimonials on your website, refer to data. The more information you have, the more effective your customer testimonials become.

Many businesses include them on their homepages. Since lots of people find businesses through Google search and land on homepages, this strategy can work well.

Other excellent places to include customer testimonials include the following:

However, you won’t know what area is most effective until you collect data.

Use a User Behaviour Tool to Watch Your Users Navigating

A behavior tool like Crazy Egg lets you spy on your website visitors’ movements throughout the site. You’ll know where they came from, what pages they visited, where they clicked, and how they engaged with interactive elements like forms.

For instance, a heatmap can show you where the most activity happens on a given page. You can also look at scroll maps to see where people stop and start scrolling on a page. This information allows you to place customer testimonials in critical areas.

For instance, if nobody scrolls to the bottom of a particular page, putting a testimonial there would be fruitless. Nobody would see it. On the other hand, if you notice that there’s lots of concentrated activity in your site’s sidebar, consider adding a testimonial there.

Test Different Places

Now comes the testing phase. Past data enables you to make an educated guess about where your customer testimonials should go, but you need hard data after you publish those testimonials to determine whether they’re having a positive impact.

Run A/B tests on specific pages and check your user behavior reports. Which version shows the most activity near your customer testimonial? Which version converted the best?

How Many Testimonials Should You Include on Your Website?

There’s no magic number here. You might have a single testimonial that comes from a recognized expert in your field, or you could have dozens of testimonials.

Many businesses have testimonial pages. You click on the link and see what everyone says about the company, product, or service.

For instance, Skyword, a content production company, uses a testimonials page to highlight quotes from its customers. Those quotes link out to individual case studies.

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If you scroll even further down, you find customer testimonials that aren’t case studies.

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customer-testimonials-for-website

customer-testimonials-for-website

The best strategy, though, is to collect as many customer testimonials as you can. Use the most impactful quotes in the key areas you identify on your site, then create a page for the rest. Anyone who wants to know what others say about your business can check.

One huge benefit of showcasing lots of customer testimonials is that it communicates two things:

  1. What people say about your business
  2. How many customers you have

You won’t get a testimonial from everyone who buys from you, but the assumption is often that a business with more testimonials has more customers. That’s always a good thing.

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customer-service-tips

customer-service-tips

Why do you need to know how to write a testimonial? Because you can review other businesses and rely on reciprocity to collect more customer testimonials.

Let’s say that your business, Company A, has used the services of Company B for years. Company B also uses your services.

You write a customer testimonial for Company B and send it in. In gratitude, Company B might write a testimonial for you.

Does it work all the time? No. But it’s a great way to collect more reviews of your business.

The best way to write a testimonial is to lead with something very specific. A testimonial that says, “Great service, great price!” isn’t very specific. It can help boost conversions, but not as much as a testimonial that pinpoints a specific area of gratitude.

For instance, let’s say Company B has fantastic customer service. You might write a testimonial that looks like this:

“Every time I had a question, Company B’s team responded immediately, even if I called late at night. They were responsive and polite, which made my work so much easier.”

That’s specific, right?

Or maybe Company B helped you achieve a goal. Your testimonial might look like this:

“After using Company B, my sales went up by 52 percent. I’m overjoyed! I don’t know how we survived before we started using this service.”

See what I mean? If you use specifics — especially numbers — your customer testimonials become far more credible and persuasive.

3 Customer Testimonials Examples That Will Inspire You

I’ve read thousands of customer testimonials over the years, and few stick out. However, I want to show you three that wowed me in terms of specificity and persuasiveness.

1. The Simple Driver

The Simple Driver is a coaching and educational website dedicated to helping people start careers as Uber drivers. The testimonials page could use some updating in terms of design, but the testimonials themselves are fantastic.

I found this one particularly illustrative:

customer-testimonials-example

customer-testimonials-example


customer-testimonials-example

customer-testimonials-example

First, you’ll notice that the testimonial includes the customer’s full name and a photograph. Excellent job.

The testimonial itself is full of specifics. First, she voices a common fear among Uber drivers — being a woman and safety concerns — and details her specific goals. Then she tells prospective customers how much money she’s making.

It’s specific and highly personal.

2. Exhibit Systems

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customer-testimonials-exhibit-system-example


customer-testimonials-exhibit-system-example

customer-testimonials-exhibit-system-example

Exhibit Systems sells exhibits for trade shows and other events. One of the customer testimonials caught my attention:
Again, there’s a lot of specificity here. The customer’s full name and industry are used to lend credibility to the testimonial, and she mentions the company’s responsiveness specifically. I also like that she talks about how the company shares her values and goals. That’s a powerful marketing message.

3. Blue Fountain Media

Another great example comes from Blue Fountain Media. This testimonial incorporates many of the desired qualities I discussed earlier in the post:

customer-testimonials-blue-fountain

customer-testimonials-blue-fountain


customer-testimonials-blue-fountain

customer-testimonials-blue-fountain

In this testimonial, we see the customer’s full name, job title, company, and link to the company’s website. The testimonial itself mentions specifics — “vibe, level of inquiry, feedback, and traffic” — to show why he particularly likes this company.

Conclusion

Customer testimonials can prove extremely persuasive in marketing, whether you retweet them from a satisfied customer or solicit them for posting on your blog.

There’s also a lot of variety in terms of how you can present them and what information to include. You might need to edit them down to get the best information from a longer review.

Whatever the case, start asking for testimonials now. Collect data from your website about how people navigate and click, then choose appropriate areas for your customer testimonials.

Once they’re live, begin your A/B tests. Nail down the ideal design. You’ll thank yourself later.

And don’t forget about reciprocity. If you offer a review, you might get a review in return.

What is the Best Homepage to Have (3 Real Examples)

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best-homepage-importance

best-homepage-importance

Remind me: How many chances do you get to make a good impression? Oh, that’s right. One. Just one.

If you don’t have the best homepage possible, that first impression becomes negative for website visitors. You lose that first impression forever.

Will the visitor come back? Maybe. But you’re playing with fire.

There aren’t any new statistics on web design aesthetics and first impressions, but an older study demonstrated that 94 percent of people’s first impressions of a business were related to web design. That’s pretty illustrative.

If you have a beautiful, functional, easily navigable homepage, you’re more likely to retain visitors and convince them to come back for more.

Without one, you’re practically shooing visitors away. And that’s bad for business.

4 Reasons Why You Need a Good Homepage

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best-homepage


best-homepage

best-homepage

Creating the best homepage for your business can pay off big time, especially if most of your visitors land on the homepage first. A consumer tells a friend to look up Company XYZ — that’s you — so the friend types “Company XYZ” in Google’s search box.

Your homepage pops up first.

But why exactly do homepages matter so much?

1. The homepage makes the brand stronger

Think of your homepage as the front of your home. It’s the curb appeal. If you have dingy paint, overgrown shrubs, lots of weeds in the yard, and a cracked driveway, people will form a negative first impression.

But what if you repainted the house, re-sodded the yard, cleaned up the beds, and added a couple tasteful yard ornaments? Suddenly, first impressions become far more positive.

You’re strengthening your brand before anyone ever steps inside your “house.” They’ve already formed an opinion of what to expect of your “home.”

The homepage you create for your business should reflect every aspect of your brand, from the color palette and logo to the words on the page.

2. Your homepage presents your offer and value

Your homepage provides your website’s “curb appeal,” but it also hints at what’s inside. What will visitors get when they dig deeper into the site?

If your value proposition remains front-and-center, visitors will immediately understand what you offer. Do you solve problems with a product or service? If so, state them clearly. Give visitors a reason to poke around and learn more about your business.

The Quicksprout homepage provides a clear example of this. It tells visitors exactly what the company will help them accomplish, then backs up that claim in the CTA for the form.

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best-homepage-quicksprout


best-homepage-quicksprout

best-homepage-quicksprout

Notice that it’s clean, appealing, and consistent. There’s nothing to distract the reader from the core message.

3. The homepage can attract and capture visitors

Ideally, your homepage will help ease your visitors into the rest of your website. You want them clicking on links, filling out forms, and checking out your blog.

MoneyMapPress, a financial publication that offers several services, does this well. It’s a clean layout with lots of negative space, but it gives visitors plenty of chances to engage with the page.

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best-homepage-moneymappress

There’s a brief introduction to the business, photographs and bios of experts, and a list of subscription services.

When you roll out the welcome mat, you let visitors know you value their presence on your website and that you want them to stick around. The best homepages don’t toss out any obstacles to prevent exploration.

4. Businesses often use homepages as landing pages

At one time, landing pages and homepages were entirely separate entities. Today, their lines have become blurred.

A landing page has one goal: Convert visitors. Homepages often have the same goal.

If you want your homepage to serve simultaneously as a landing page, you have to remove distractions — at least above the fold.

That’s what we did with Neil Patel Digital.

best-homepage-neil-patel-digital

best-homepage-neil-patel-digital


best-homepage-neil-patel-digital

best-homepage-neil-patel-digital

There are navigation links, but they’re less obtrusive than the headline and call to action.

You need the best homepage design if you want it to work effectively as a lead generation asset and landing page.

3 Real Homepage Examples and Why They Work

Now that I’ve covered the basics of why you need the best homepage possible, let’s look at some examples that work extremely well. Don’t copy other people’s designs, but let them inspire you to improve your homepage and make it more efficient.

1. Copyblogger

The Copyblogger website uses the hero image approach to homepage design — and it works beautifully. The site is clean and minimalist, using light colors and an image that’s simultaneously inviting and unobtrusive.

best-homepage-copyblogger

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best-homepage-copyblogger

best-homepage-copyblogger

You get everything you expect from a homepage, from the logo and tagline to the navigation bar at the top. There’s also the value proposition on top of the hero image, which helps cement the company’s value.

Why it works

Hero image homepages work well when you’re selling a single value proposition. It’s not ideal for e-commerce homepages — unless you sell just one product — but it’s perfect for service businesses that have a core or flagship service they provide.

Humans respond well to visual imagery. In fact, nearly 60 percent of customers surveyed in one study said they would rather engage with a beautifully designed web page than one that was simply designed. Consumers are judging your business based on homepage aesthetics.

2. Uber

Anyone who knows me will tell you I hate to drive. I’m always calling Ubers to pick me up.

I’m also a big fan of its websites. It offers one of the best homepage designs I’ve seen in a long time.

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best-homepage-uber

It’s a great example of seamlessly combining two value propositions: Get a safe, inexpensive ride or become a driver and make money.

That’s no easy feat, especially with so few words on the page.

Why it works

If you look at each individual element on Uber’s homepage, you’ll notice that it’s all designed to funnel website visitors toward one action or another. They want you to sign up for an account so you can order Uber rides or sign up as a driver and earn cash.

Those are two entirely different segments of the market. Yet it somehow works.

Notice the image choice. The guy behind the wheel is clearly an Uber driver, but he’s staring right at the camera — at you. If you wanted to order an Uber, he’s someone you’d feel comfortable getting in the car with. Or, if you wanted a part-time hustle, he’s someone whose success you’d want to emulate.

The rest of the homepage provides tons more information, from a map and quoting form for getting from one place to another to blurbs about the company’s value proposition.

3. Rosetta Stone

If you’re not familiar with Rosetta Stone, it’s a suite of tools designed to help you learn a foreign language. It’s on the high end of the pricing spectrum, but it’s still hugely popular.

Also, it’s one of the best homepage examples I’ve seen for an e-commerce site.

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best-homepage-rosetta

We’re dealing with a hero image again, this time of a worldly traveler who’s using his phone — ostensibly to access the Rosetta Stone app.

Why it works

Rosetta Stone leads with its primary USP: TruAccent technology. The value-added benefits of the technology set it apart from its competitors and make it seem more effective at helping people learn language skills.

Then you have another value proposition: The company has been in operation for 25 years. There’s also social proof: “The most trusted language solution…”

Rosetta Stone might benefit from some hard numbers here. How many customers does it serve? That might be more impressive. But it’s the only fault I find in its homepage.

There’s a major call to action for launching an interactive demo, but users can also find out about specific solutions for different customer segments: individuals, educators, and businesses.

This homepage does an excellent job of capturing the visitor’s attention and providing plenty of places to explore without distracting the visitor from the primary CTA.

Homepage Optimization Checklist

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best-homepage-optimization-techniques


best-homepage-optimization-techniques

best-homepage-optimization-techniques

You’ve seen three real-life examples of some of the best homepage designs on the Internet, but what can you take away from them? And how do you design the best homepage for your business?

Believe it or not, homepage design boils down to five simple elements. You have lots of room to play with creativity, but make sure you’re presenting your offer clearly and without distraction.

Here’s a handy checklist of things to include on your own homepage to improve it and boost conversions.

1. Write a strong and clear headline

Each of the three examples I mentioned above has a clear, specific headline to anchor the page. Let’s look at each headline here:

  • Build Your Online Authority With Powerfully Effective Content Marketing
  • Get There — Your Day Belongs to You
  • The only language software with TruAccent™ — the world’s best speech recognition technology.

They’re obviously very different, but they have several things in common.

First, they use power words. These are words that immediately evoke an emotion or connect with the reader.

Copyblogger focuses on words like “authority” and “powerfully effective.” They’re not impressive on their own, but when built into a concise headline, they help send a stronger message.

Uber takes a more emotive approach. Instead of stating its value proposition outright, Uber appeals to what their target customers want: freedom, efficiency, and a destination.

Then you have Rosetta Stone, which uses words like “only” and “world’s best” to convey credibility and authority. Those words imply that Rosetta Stone is all you need to accomplish your goals.

Write strong headlines by putting yourself in the customer’s shoes. What would impress him or her? What would connect with that person enough to convince him or her to explore the rest of your site? Or to fill out a form?

2. Don’t confuse your users

One of the most common issues I notice on homepages is conflicting CTAs. It’s okay to have more than one option, but you need a dominant CTA — one that shows exactly what you want the visitor to do.

More importantly, you want to avoid visual clutter. Just like you pick up toys, clothes, scattered magazines, and other detritus at home, you want to remove any confusing visual elements from your homepage.

In other words, keep it simple.

You want enough on the page to attract attention, but not so much that readers don’t know where to look.

3. Add a direct and big CTA button for the offer

Your CTA is where you want your visitors to focus their attention. It’s an invitation: Here’s what to do next!

The CTA button shouldn’t take over your entire screen, but it should get the visitor’s attention. Consider using a unique font if you don’t think it’s captivating enough.

Additionally, make sure you use a call-to-action phrase that makes sense and conveys value. A CTA like “Subscribe Now” doesn’t thrill me. Change it to: Subscribe Now to Get a Free Case Study.” Now I’m interested.

Avoid conflicting CTAs as much as possible. You can have more than one option, but make clear that there’s a single CTA you want your visitors to follow through on specifically. You can see how both Uber and Rosetta Stone did this in the examples above by making the alternate CTAs smaller and less obvious.

4. Use contrasting colors

I’m a big fan of contrast when it comes to my sites. You’ll see my signature orange color on NeilPatel.com and Neil Patel Digital.

Contrast doesn’t just mean a loud or obnoxious color. You can create contrast in numerous ways.

For instance, a bold color for the background and a neutral color for the text on a CTA will work well. You don’t want lime green on electric blue — that’s hard on the eyes.

In a CTA, you can also use a color that isn’t found elsewhere on the page. Just make sure it doesn’t strike too much visual discord. Learning the color wheel and how colors complement one another will make you a better designer.

5. Keep the offer above the fold

Your website visitors might never scroll beyond the fold. That’s just fact. If you bury your offer underneath the fold, many of your visitors will never see it.

As you can see from the best homepage examples I mentioned above, every one includes the offer or USP above the fold. It’s obvious from the moment the visitor arrives.

How to Find Out What’s Working and What’s Not on Your Homepage

Web design is extremely subjective. I might love a site’s design, while you might hate it. There’s no way to please everyone.

However, you can please most of the people who visit your site. How? You figure out what’s working and what’s not.

Crazy Egg lets you run user behavior reports on your site. You’ll see where people click, scroll, and otherwise engage with elements of your site.

A heatmap, for instance, provides you with tons of data. Consider looking at your confetti report. It shows you granular information about referral sites and how people who come from different places engage with your site.

best-homepage-confetti-report

best-homepage-confetti-report


best-homepage-confetti-report

best-homepage-confetti-report

Plus, you’ll see who bounces and who stays so you can adjust your homepage accordingly.

Do people tend to skip over your CTA when they come from Facebook? Maybe your Facebook posts aren’t aligning with the design of your site.

Other user behavior reports allow you to view this data in different ways. For instance, a standard heatmap shows areas of “hot” activity and “cold” inactivity. Positioning your homepage elements to align with eye tracking can make it more effective.

After you collect this information, create two versions of your website. Present one version to half your visitors and the other to the remainder. This process of A/B testing individual elements will help you refine your site so it’s ideal for your target audience.

Conclusion

best-homepage-conclusion

best-homepage-conclusion


best-homepage-conclusion

best-homepage-conclusion

Your homepage is often the first thing a new prospective customer sees when encountering your brand. You want to make the best possible first impression, right?

That demands the best homepage for your audience.

As you can see from the examples I mentioned above, there can be lots of variation. Colors, imagery, and layouts change, but the simple elements don’t.

What works on the best homepage designs?

If you can incorporate those elements into your homepage, you’ll find yourself ahead of the competition.

But there’s more.

How do you know that the colors, fonts, visuals, and copywriting you selected will work on your specific audience? You don’t. At least, not until you test.

Use Crazy Egg’s user behavior reports to spy on your visitors. Figure out what works, what doesn’t, and what you should test for the future.

The more attention you pay to your homepage, the more effective the homepage becomes at attracting and retaining your visitors.

The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

popup-forms

popup-forms


popup-forms

popup-forms

The ultimate end goal for every single visitor to your website is to turn them into a customer or a recurring visitor.

The problem is that turning visitors into regulars can be tricky.

Really tricky.

There is, however, an easier way to convert visitors without wasting your time or theirs—and it comes in an unexpected form.

Pop-up form, to be exact.

Simply by using well placed popup forms, you can boost your email subscription rate by 317% or more.

With this in mind, we’re going to take a look at our top seven pop-up recommendations and discover how they’ll help you boost your conversion rates.

But first, let’s look at some of the qualities that make a great popup form.

What Makes a Great Popup Form?

  • Marketing Copy

The very first aspect of any successful pop-up form is marketing copy. When you place a pop-up on your website, it’s absolutely essential that the visitor understands exactly what to do and why.

Marketing copy essentially lets all the visitors coming to your page know how they can benefit from filling out the information that you are asking for in the form.

In other words—it provides incentive.

Without this first aspect of the form, there will be no incentive to fill out the form and it will simply be ignored.

When visitors come to your site, many of them will not know exactly what they are coming to.

When the first thing visitors run into on your site is a pop-up, it’s important that they also see your brand and get a taste of what you’re about.

Branding goes beyond the simple act of putting your name on the pop-up form—it also includes making it attractive and giving it a sense of purpose.

Your pop-up should deliver a message about your product and how it will fit into the life of the customer.

Remember, this is the very first taste they are getting of your business—make it good.

Along the same lines of the branding, including attractive imagery in your pop-ups is another aspect of increasing conversions.

Put yourself back in the shoes of the visitor coming to your site. You see a pop-up, but all it has is simple text with no type of image or design.

Are you going to put your e-mail into the form?

I sure wouldn’t. That’s why including some type of imagery or design in your forms is another integral part of making return customers out of one-time visitors.

Imagery doesn’t necessarily mean pictures. If your website is going for a minimalist look, a simple design is fine. The only thing you’re trying to avoid here is keeping your visitor from clicking the “exit” button before they even see what you have to offer.

  • Call to Action

Finally, make sure you have some type of call to action. Otherwise, your pop-up is not going to drive a conversion for you.

A call to action doesn’t need to be a paragraph-long explanation of your brand, company story, or how you can help them if they’ll just type their email in.

Think simple. What is the fewest number of words you can use to make your form seem irresistible?

A call to action should be just that. One sentence with five words that says you’re giving away an e-book, a webinar, a gift card, or whatever your incentive is.

A simple call to action with a clear expected response is perfect. An example of a clear response is an input bar for an email address and a submit button.

The simpler and easier your call to action is, the more likely your visitors are to respond.

That’s it! Those are the components of a successful pop-up form that is very likely to produce conversions and boost your brand.

The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

With these aspects in mind, let’s look at our top seven pop-up forms and how you can use them as inspiration to boost your website conversion rates.

  • Ecommerce: Fab.com

popup-forms-ecommerce-fab

popup-forms-ecommerce-fab


popup-forms-ecommerce-fab

popup-forms-ecommerce-fab

This first pop-up from Fab.com hits all the main points that we just talked about that help turn visitors into customers. Let’s break it down piece by piece.

First, the fun phrasing and statement about the offer are an immediate incentive to respond. The visitor automatically has a reason to fill out the form because the value proposition (“Enjoy 10% off your first order”) is spelled out in capital letters.

Visitors are much more likely to respond to clever, fun wording and marketing copy, which means you’re much more likely to make another conversion.

Second, the form is very attractive and well-designed, which makes the visitor want to put their e-mail into the input box.

The form also makes sense given the content of the website.

If the content on your website is centered around simplicity, design, creativity, or anything else, it is a very good idea to reflect that content in your pop-up forms.

Finally, the input requested here is very simple and easy. The simpler you make the input, the more likely the customer is to actually fill it out. Here, the e-mail is the only thing that is required and the blue “SUBMIT” CTA button stands out from the rest of the form with a nice pop of contrast. .

2. B2B: Web Ascender

popup-forms-b2b-web-ascender

popup-forms-b2b-web-ascender


popup-forms-b2b-web-ascender

popup-forms-b2b-web-ascender

This form from Web Ascender is another example of a simple, well designed pop-up that is sure to generate a response and boost conversions.

There are several reasons for this:

  • The marketing copy on the form is attractive and enticing. By appealing to customers’ desire to learn and gain experience from the website, the copy offers a strong incentive to respond.To use this same technique on your own website, try to consider what your brand offers and make an appeal to it in the form.
  • By adding a small, attractive logo to the form, the website is able to maintain a strong connection between the brand and the benefits being received. A clearly branded form is much more effective, so putting your brand on your pop-ups is a must.
  • The imagery is subtle, but it still makes the form much more interesting and appealing. On a simple blue background, this form would be boring. However, the faded image keeps the visitor’s attention.
  • Finally, the call to action is a simple e-mail input and the offer of monthly updates with valuable information.

3. B2C: Foreignpolicy.com

popup-forms-b2c-foreignpolicy

popup-forms-b2c-foreignpolicy


popup-forms-b2c-foreignpolicy

popup-forms-b2c-foreignpolicy

This is the pop-up for foreignpolicy.com, an online magazine. They take advantage of several key factors and some of the things that distinguish them as a brand to make the form as attractive as possible.

The dollar makes the simplistic design easy to look at and intriguing enough to read the whole pop-up. The bold color contrast and minimalist approach is maintained throughout the rest of the website as well, so there is  continuity between the website and the form.

In addition to being well-designed, the marketing copy and branding both contribute to the success of the pop-up because the reader is not left with any questions about the brand, the purpose, or the value.

When creating your own pop-ups, make sure to include some of these valuable aspects so that website visitors immediately understand the value that you have to offer them.

Finally, the incentive and call to action are simple and easy to execute. The reader is hooked by the offer of a 99 cent subscription and only has to click one button before they are redirected to the form to be filled out.

4. Ecommerce: La Mer

popup-forms-lamer

popup-forms-lamer


popup-forms-lamer

popup-forms-lamer

This form from La Mer is very creative and attractive and shows a different side of pop-up design.

The artistic simplicity of this pop-up form fits very well with the design of the rest of the website and also incorporates branding into the photo, giving users the chance to develop the desire for the product.

As with some of the other pop-ups we’ve looked at, the marketing copy here is creative and maintains the customer’s interest.

The incentive is “inside offers” and “an exclusive introduction” to a special product, which is specific enough to be interesting but vague enough to be enticing.

If you decide to go with a design like this, just make sure that it fits in with the rest of your website, because a disconnect between the styles of your website and your pop-ups will feel odd and reduce conversions.

5. Ecommerce: Startup Vitamins

popup-forms-startup-vitamins

popup-forms-startup-vitamins


popup-forms-startup-vitamins

popup-forms-startup-vitamins

Even though most of the forms we’ve looked at up till this point are heavily focused on design, it is not at all a requirement.

The coloring on this simple “Subscribe to our newsletter” pop-up is very minimalist and simply designed, but it’s still interesting enough to drive conversions.

First of all, the website is focused on encouraging purchases, so the pop-up form’s incentive is highly relevant to anyone who is visiting the site.

This brings up an important point—the more relevant and immediately helpful the incentive is, the more likely it is that it will increase conversions. The $5 off coupon being offered here is helpful to anyone buying from the site, so it is likely to have a high conversion rate.

Second, the simplicity of the form can actually be a very attractive way of presenting the incentive. Rather than masking a simple coupon with photos, complex designs, or other marketing techniques, the creator of the pop-up gives the reader the simple chance to opt in to the newsletter and receive a discount.

If you decide on a straightforward design like this, just make sure that you do something to it to make it more interesting than simple black text on a white background.

Here, the color and the small logo keep the visitor’s attention long enough to read the offer and type in their e-mail address.

6. Ecommerce: Kate Spade Saturday

popup-forms-kate-spade-saturday

popup-forms-kate-spade-saturday


popup-forms-kate-spade-saturday

popup-forms-kate-spade-saturday

While we’re looking at simple designs, this is a very attractive circular pop-up from Kate Spade Saturday that has no pictures or logos, but it is playful, fun, and has great marketing copy.

One of the most interesting things about this type of pop-up is how much text is on it. Even though having too much text is dangerous and you can run the risk of losing visitors’ interest, keeping it playful like this form can be inviting.

Having fun with the text, shape, and color of your pop-up—especially if your website is geared toward quirky customers—can be an interesting way to differentiate your pop-ups from those that web surfers undoubtedly encounter when they are on your competitors’ websites.

7. Ecommerce: Cigar Cutters By Jim

popup-forms-cigar-cutters

popup-forms-cigar-cutters


popup-forms-cigar-cutters

popup-forms-cigar-cutters

This final pop-up form is one of the most distinct that we’ve looked at, which is one of the reasons why I like it so much.

It’s a great roundup of all the different techniques we’ve talked about, but it also displays different products and allows the reader to really imagine themselves enjoying the benefits that will come from being on the website.

The incentive of 10% off placed next to the photos of real products combine to make a powerful incentive for customers to input their name and email. Additionally, the rugged design fits well with the overall theme of the website.

By combining different pop-up techniques in a way that fits your taste and website style, you can create enticing forms that will convert more visitors than ever before.

Conclusion

Popup forms are an effective tool for turning one-time visitors into customers, but there is definitely an art to creating a pop-up that is going to convert effectively.

By utilizing good marketing copy, images, branding, and a call to action in ways that support your brand and fit in with the rest of the website, you can create lead-generating forms.

Now that you know how to create powerful  pop-ups, it’s time to put that knowledge to work!

Start using Crazy Egg tools to optimize your pop-up forms

Author Bio

popup-forms-post-author

popup-forms-post-author


popup-forms-post-author

popup-forms-post-author

Yassir Sahnoun is a founder, content strategist, and consultant at YassirSahnoun.com, and a co-founder at WriteWorldwide. He helps companies attract sales using content strategy, copywriting, blogging, email marketing, & more. If you want to skyrocket your sales and up your content marketing game, you can schedule a free discovery call with Yassir by clicking here.

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Why Content Marketing Works for Me and Not You

neil patel content

neil patel content


neil patel content

neil patel content

It’s funny, when I meet people who are leveraging content marketing, they always tell me one of two things…

Either they can’t figure out how to generate traffic (no matter how many blog posts they publish)…

OR

They’ve figured out how to generate more traffic, but the traffic hasn’t turned into any sales or new customers and they can’t figure out why.

Now, I know what you are thinking… there are so many companies that make millions from content marketing that there must be a way to make it work.

But here’s the thing. Because of my ad agency, I am able to talk to thousands of companies each year and dig into their marketing. And of the ones that leverage content marketing, most aren’t able to generate even one sale from it.

In other words, it’s not working for them.

It’s not because content marketing is flawed. It’s that most people don’t fully understand it.

Why doesn’t content marketing work for most businesses?

What most people don’t realize is that all visitors are not the same. And I’m not talking about demographics and income, I’m talking about intent.

When you land on a web page that ranks on Google because of content marketing, your actions are going to be different than if you clicked on a paid listing.

And it’s not because one is paid and one is organic… here’s what I mean.

When you do a search on Google for the term “auto insurance” you’ll see a search results page that looks something like this:

google search

google search


google search

google search

And you’ll either click on a paid listing or an organic one.

Here’s what one of the paid listings looks like:

AAA

AAA


AAA

AAA

And here’s what one of the organic listings looks like:

nationwide

nationwide


nationwide

nationwide

As you can see, the organic listing contains a lot of content… including information about the city where I performed the search, insurance options, and why I should choose Nationwide.

To some extent, it is educational and salesy all at the same time, but I’m not being sold as hard as the paid listing from AAA.

The AAA landing page only has 73 words. That’s it… a measly 73 words.

In other words, if you land on the AAA landing page you are going to click on one of the two insurance options.

On the other hand, if you land on the Nationwide site (who leverages content marketing), your eyes focus on the text instead of filling out the auto insurance lead form.

And that’s what I mean by intent.

Even though I performed the search “auto insurance,” I’m more likely to buy from the AAA site because it’s a more aggressive landing page. The Nationwide site puts me in a more educational mindset, in which I am going to read and do some research versus just getting a quote.

And Nationwide isn’t doing this because they want to educate. They are doing this because it is really hard to rank organically without providing tons of content.

Google loves content, hence the average web page that ranks on page one contains 1,890 words.

content length

content length


content length

content length

That’s why Wikipedia ranks for everything under the sun.

If you are going to leverage content marketing, you have to keep in mind that when people land on your site it will put them in the mood of reading and learning instead of buying.

So, does that mean content marketing doesn’t work?

Content marketing is amazing, and it still works really well. It doesn’t produce as many conversions as paid advertising, but you can also build up massive amounts of traffic without burning a hole in your wallet.

Let’s look at NeilPatel.com and how I leverage content marketing.

Over the last 31 days, this blog has generated 2,510,893 visits of which 1,609,314 were unique. And those visitors generated 5,890,103 pageviews.

np traffic july

np traffic july


np traffic july

np traffic july

That’s not bad, especially if you consider that I am not really leveraging paid ads (other than the few blog posts I modestly boost on Facebook each month).

And during that time period, we generated 1,942 leads within the United States of which 262 came from companies who were spending over $5,000 a month on marketing.

july

july


july

july

Most leads don’t turn into sales within 30 days as our sales cycle is longer, but so far those leads have generated $972,860 in contract value (we haven’t collected all of that money yet, but we will over the next 12 months).

The number I shared above is just revenue, it’s not profit. That number, of course, will go up as many more of the leads will turn into contracts but at the same time, my expenses will go up too.

So, can you guess how I generated almost a million dollars in new contracts in just 30 days.

Well first off, it wasn’t me… I have an amazing sales team lead by a guy named Nick Roshon. And we have an amazing fulfillment team that helps the sales team close more deals.

But the lead generation is all me… and that came from content marketing.

In other words, content marketing works… as long as you think about it the right way.

So how should you think about content marketing?

The first part is traffic. You need traffic before you can do anything else.

How do you build up traffic via content marketing?

Well, you need to write blog posts. I won’t go too in-depth on how to write blog posts as I have tons of blog posts already on that.

If you are going to take the route of hiring other writers, make sure you tell them the following rules:

  1. You and I – use the words “you” and “I” to make the blog posts seem like a conversation. For example, “Don’t you hate it when people tell you that some things just aren’t possible? I know I do.” You see how that sounds conversational?
  2. 3 sections – a blog post should be structured with 3 main sections: Introduction, body, and conclusion. By structuring every one of your posts the same way, your readers will know what to expect and it will make it easier to skim your content. (The majority of your website visitors will skim and not read.)
  3. Conclusion – the conclusion should be labeled “Conclusion.” The reason you want to do this is that roughly 8% of your readers will scroll down to the bottom of your blog post to read the conclusion. If they like the conclusion they will scroll back up and read the rest. (The 8% stat is from NeilPatel.com. I’m not sure what the percentage will be for your blog but I used Crazy Egg to figure this out.)
  4. Subheadings – the body should contain subheadings, that way it is easier for people to skim. The subheadings should describe what the section is about and if you can naturally place keywords within it, feel free to do so. Just don’t force it.
  5. Short paragraphs – try to keep the paragraphs less than 5 or 6 lines. It’s easier on the eyes, especially on mobile.
  6. Facts and data – use stats and data to back up your talking points. Feel free to reference other sites and link to them. This will validate your content and also brand you as an authority over time.
  7. Images – use screenshots and photography to help get your point across. Some people are visual learners, so use images when it makes sense. If you are using someone else’s images, look for copyright information and make sure you cite your sources.
  8. 2,000 to 3,000 words – it varies per industry, but if you are in a competitive industry, consider making your blog posts 2,000 or more words. I showed you earlier in this post how Google prefers ranking content that is at least 1,890 words on page 1. If you are not in a competitive industry, you can write content that is less than 1,000 words. Over time you can go back to the blog posts that are gaining traction and expand them.
  9. Headlines have to be amazing8 out of 10 people will read your headline but only 2 out of 10 will click through and read the rest of your article. Before you hit the publish button, check out these stats from Buzzsumo on writing appealing headlines.
  10. End with a question – wrap up your conclusion with a question. People are more likely to leave a comment when you ask them a question. Make sure you do this as you want engagement.

Now that you have the writing process down, it’s time to come up with topic ideas. The easiest way to figure out what’s hot is to just type in keywords within your space on Buzzsumo.

buzzsump

buzzsump


buzzsump

buzzsump

You just insert a keyword and Buzzsumo will show you all of the articles around the web that are popular related to that keyword.

By doing this you will see what people like in your space. I’m not saying you should copy these articles but instead to use them for ideas. The last thing you want to do is write content that people don’t care to read.

In addition to typing in a keyword, you can also type a URL into Buzzsumo. For example, I typed in Hubspot.com and it shows me all of their top articles.

buzzsumo hubspot

buzzsumo hubspot


buzzsumo hubspot

buzzsumo hubspot

This will give you an idea of what is working for your competition.

Now that you have some topic ideas, it’s time for you to write a blog post (or pay someone to write it for you). Just keep in mind your content has to be better than your competition. If it isn’t better than what they have, it will be hard for you to get more social shares or outrank them.

When I publish a blog post, I like asking myself the following questions:

  1. Is your blog post more actionable than your competitors? (If not, fix it.)
  2. Did you write on something unique or provide a different perspective than your competition? (If not, fix it.)
  3. Would you be embarrassed if a friend or co-worker read your article? (Don’t ever publish something you wouldn’t want others to read… fix your content.)
  4. Would you be willing to ask other people to share your content on social media and link to it? (If not, make your content better.)
  5. Did you come up with 10 headline variations? (Don’t settle on your first headline, try to think of better ones.)

Assuming you passed all of the questions, it’s time to publish your content and generate some traffic.

So how do I generate traffic?

Sadly, there is no quick way to grow your traffic. It’s a slow grind, but over time your traffic will go up.

Here’s the traffic to the NeilPatel.com blog when I first started:

neil patel blog post

neil patel blog post


neil patel blog post

neil patel blog post

As you can see I generated 9,065 unique visitors in my first month back in August of 2014. I generated those visitors from the 4 strategies that I will break down in a bit (they still work).

And if you fast forward to the 1-year mark, I was able to 10x my traffic by August of 2015.

one year

one year


one year

one year

My traffic has continually gone up over time as well, which you can see by scrolling back up towards the beginning of this post (I’m now at 2,510,893 monthly visits, yay!).

So how do you generate more traffic?

Well, first off you need to be patient. Don’t expect the same results I achieved. Marketing is what I do, and I’m willing to dedicate more time and energy than most people.

So here are the 4 strategies I used when I started NeilPatel.com (and I still use them today).

Keep in mind that these tactics work for all types of sites and I’m assuming here that you don’t have a social following, so I won’t be giving you basic advice like “share your article on LinkedIn”.

Strategy #1: Boosting posts

Still to this day I boost my posts on Facebook. It worked even better when I was starting off, but it still works well today as it helps generate traction.

boosted posts

boosted posts


boosted posts

boosted posts

As you can see from the screenshot above, I boosted my last week’s post. I tend to boost all of my posts, which is roughly 4 times a month.

I spend $400 per post. I pick the regions: United Stated States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom when boosting.

You should pick the regions where most of your ideal customers are (ideally, I should only be boosting within the United States) and make your boost lasts 2 weeks as the clicks will be cheaper than if you spent it all in one day.

If you continually do this your traffic will grow over time and you will also get more organic Facebook traffic by boosting.

If you aren’t, that means people don’t care for your content… which means you need to go back and adjust your content with the tips I broke down above.

Strategy #2: Email everyone you linked to

Within your blog post, you should have linked to other sites. As I mentioned above, you want to cite your sources and link to places where you are finding data/stats.

Every time I link to a website, I will go to their site and try to find the email of the website owner so I can let them know I linked to them.

But before I share with you an email template to send, keep in mind that you will have to modify it for your website. I can’t emphasize this enough.

And I know some of you don’t think emailing works because you get so many link building requests, but if it didn’t work you wouldn’t be getting all of those emails. 😉

I typically send an email that goes something like this…

Hey John,

Thanks for taking the time to come up with stats around XYZ. I know it’s hard work, but bloggers like me appreciate it. I just borrowed some of your stats for my latest blog post and of course I linked to you and gave you credit.

[insert link to your blog post]

Feel free and check it out and let me know what you think.

Cheers,

Neil Patel

PS: If you like the post, feel free and share it on your favorite social network. 

PPS: If you ever come up with any other cool research, let me know. I may want to include it in a future post.

You need to customize the email template because the more customized it is, the better it will do.

I’ve found that if I email out 20 people, 4 or 5 usually will email me back saying thanks.

When emailing people, keep in mind that there are GDPR rules. So, you may be better off going through the contact forms on people’s website versus just sending them a cold email.

If you aren’t sure if you are breaking any GDPR rules, check with a lawyer as they’ll know much more than I will.

Strategy #3: Top sharers

One of my favorite features of Buzzsumo is that it shows you all of the people who shared your competition’s content.

All you have to do is type in the URL of your competition and click on “view sharers.”

view sharers

view sharers


view sharers

view sharers

From there you will be presented with a list of people who shared that content.

sharers

sharers


sharers

sharers

You’ll want to go to each of their Twitter profiles (or do some Googling) to see if you can find their email address or website.

Similar to the previous strategy, you’ll want to email them something that goes like this:

Hey Amanda,

Hope you are doing well.

I noticed that you tweeted out [insert the title of the article they tweeted] by author [insert author name].

It’s a good article, but it doesn’t discuss [insert what the article is missing].

Because of that, I wrote a similar article that’s more complete and up-to-date.

Let me know if you would like to check it out.

Cheers,

Neil Patel

You’ll notice that I didn’t link to my article. I first wait for their reply as I have found it to produce better results.

Typically, they will email back with something like:

Sure, I would like to see it.

And then you’ll respond with:

Here you go:

[insert link]

Feel free and share it if you like it 🙂

Cheers,

Neil

PS: Let me know if I can share anything for you.

It ranges depending on which industry you are in but typically 9% to 30% of the people you email will share your article out as well.

If you are getting a percentage that is lower than that it means that your content isn’t that great or the people you are emailing tweeted the original article out years ago instead of recently (people forget what they tweeted over time).

Again, make sure you follow GDPR rules with this tactic (feel free and consult a lawyer). You can always message people through their website contact form as well.

Strategy #4: Beg for links

The last thing I like to do within Buzzsumo is to see who linked to my competitors. You can click on “view backlinks” to see who links to similar articles from your competitors.

view backlinks

view backlinks


view backlinks

view backlinks

From there you will see a list of backlinks pointing to your competition:

backlink list

backlink list


backlink list

backlink list

And just like the previous strategies you can do some manual outreach and send them an email that goes something like:

Hey John,

Hope you are doing well.

I was reading [insert URL of the page on their site that is linking out to your competition] and I noticed you mentioned [competition’s name].

The problem with the link is that you are pointing your readers to an article that isn’t complete. It doesn’t discuss [talk about why the competition’s article isn’t as useful and thorough].

If you want to fix this, check out my article below as it addresses everything I mentioned above.

[insert link to your article]

Cheers,

Neil Patel

PS: If you want to provide more value to your readers, feel free and link to my article.

PPS: Let me know if I can do anything for you.

The email template is a bit generic, but if you modify it, personalize it, and adapt it to your business you’ll see decent results.

If you email out 100 people you should get at least 4 to 6 links.

Again, make sure you check in with a lawyer about GDPR rules as you don’t want to get in trouble for sending off cold emails to people that you shouldn’t be.

You can also send the message using the contact forms on peoples’ websites.

Now that your traffic is growing, let’s focus on building up a community.

How to build a community

A blog without a loyal fan base is tough to monetize. Without this, you won’t do well. This is the big reason that most companies I talk to never do well with their content marketing.

They just lack a community.

This doesn’t mean you won’t be able to monetize if you don’t have a community, it just means it will be harder.

But before I go into building a community, you’ll want to leverage social networks like Facebook and LinkedIn. Just remember that as they continually adjust their algorithms, it will be harder to rely on them.

For that reason, I like focusing on the tactics below.

Tactic #1: Subscribers

Some of you may have noticed that every time I publish a new blog post you get a browser notification telling you about it.

Just through browser notifications, also known as push notifications, I am able to generate an extra 42,316 visitors per month.

push traffic

push traffic


push traffic

push traffic

The way I do this is through a free tool called Subscribers.

Subscribers allows your blog readers to subscribe to your blog through their web browser (Chrome, Firefox, etc.).

The way it does this is by asking people if they want to receive “notifications” from your website (aka subscribe).

It’s the same strategy as Facebook and YouTube use.

push optin

push optin


push optin

push optin

The best part about it is that it is easy for your readers to subscribe because all they have to do is click “allow”. They don’t have enter in their name, email address or any personal information.

Once you sign up for Subscribers it will give you a JavaScript or a WordPress plugin to install. Every time someone goes to your website they will then receive a notification similar to the Facebook example above.

And over time your subscriber count will continually increase… here’s a screenshot of my dashboard with my subscriber count:

subscribers dashbaord

subscribers dashbaord


subscribers dashbaord

subscribers dashbaord

As you send out push notifications, you’ll see that people will “unsubscribe” themselves, similar to email, which is fine. But in general, it is the most effective way to boost your traffic.

All you have to do is hit the “send a notification” button within your Subscribers dashboard if you want to notify your subscribers of a new blog post. When you hit the “send a notification” button, you will see a screen that looks like this:

subscribers send

subscribers send


subscribers send

subscribers send

You can even add UTM codes, which will give you tracking within your Google Analytics.

You can pick what image you want to include with the push notification (as well as see a preview of it on the left side) and you can schedule it if you want it to go out at a later time or day.

Once you hit send, your subscribers will get a notification that looks something like this in their browser:

neil test sub

neil test sub


neil test sub

neil test sub

Whether you decided to use UTMs or not, you can always see your stats for each push within your Subscribers dashboard.

subscriber stats

subscriber stats


subscriber stats

subscriber stats

Even though I don’t talk about push notifications much, it really is the easiest way to build a community and get people to come back to your site.

There is only one issue when you use tools like Subscribers, you have to be patient. You won’t have a big list of subscribers from day one. It will take months before you see it really kicking in.

It’s more effective than email marketing and best of all Subscribers is free.

Tactic #2: Collect emails

Similar to tactic number 1, a lot of you are on my email list. I received 37,726 visitors from emailing out blog posts over the last 31 days.

email stats

email stats


email stats

email stats

Although that number may not seem high, emails make up one of my most loyal segments. If I do an email blast selling a product or service, I can instantly generate $100,000 (seriously).

And similar to Subscribers, I use a free email collection tool called Hello Bar to collect emails and build a community.

You can go, signup, add your website, and install the WordPress plugin they give you (or JavaScript).

Once you are up and running I would create an exit popup similar to what I have on NeilPatel.com.

exitpopup

exitpopup


exitpopup

exitpopup

I know most of you don’t like exit popups, but they are really effective. I collect over 1,000 emails a day from my exit popup.

As long as you are providing value and giving away something people will love, then they won’t mind entering their email address.

There are two cool parts about Hello Bar that I love:

  1. It’s GDPR compliant – they have GDPR settings in there.
  2. It has custom targeting settings – you can pick who sees your optin and when they see it. For example, I only show it to people once and only when they are leaving the site.

Once you log into Hello Bar, you’ll see a wizard that looks something like this:

hello bar wizard

hello bar wizard


hello bar wizard

hello bar wizard

You can choose from tons of different templates and designs. You can even upload a custom background image if you want (for this purpose I just picked the most basic template to show you how it works).

wysiwyg

wysiwyg


wysiwyg

wysiwyg

And once you pick a template you like, you can easily modify the design or image using the WYSIWYG editor.

If you also have traffic from different sources like I do (mobile, tablet, desktop) you can pick different layout types and designs for each device type.

You can also create different popups for different regions. For example, here is my Hello Bar exit popup for Brazil:

brazil popup

brazil popup


brazil popup

brazil popup

Out of all the methods I’ve tested for email collection, exit popups work the best.

But if you really don’t want to use them, you can create sliders, bars, and other forms of email collection boxes using Hello Bar that aren’t as aggressive.

Now that you have an email list going, you’ll want to send out an email blast to your list every time you publish a blog (or every time you publish an amazing one if you blog too often – you don’t want to clutter people’s inbox).

What I’ve found is that I generate more comments and social shares from my push notification and email list than any other channel.

To give you an idea, over the last 31 days, push notifications made up 38.5% of my blog comments and email has made up 32.3% of my comments.

It’s crazy… they beat out every other channel by far.

So, what’s next?

Well, assuming you are growing your traffic, collecting more subscribers and emails… you should be building a nice solid user base to monetize.

You have a few ways you can monetize.

The first is to just sell more products. A great example of this is Legion Athletics. It’s an 8-figure business that started with content marketing.

When you go to Legion’s blog, you’ll notice that they do a few things…

First, they try and push you into taking their quiz as it is a great way for them to make product recommendations based on your needs.

legion quiz

legion quiz


legion quiz

legion quiz

Once you start taking the quiz, they’ll ask you personalized questions so they can direct you towards the right supplements for you.

quiz questions

quiz questions


quiz questions

quiz questions

It’s one of the best ways to convert blog readers into customers. And if you don’t know how to create a quiz, just check out Lead Quizzes. It’s a software that does it for you.

It works so well, I even have a quiz on NeilPatel.com.

neil patel quiz

neil patel quiz


neil patel quiz

neil patel quiz

In other words, quizzes work well for both B2B and B2C sites. It doesn’t matter if you are selling a product, service, or info product, quizzes work.

Heck, at one point I was able to grow my lead count by 500% through quizzes.

Now going back to Legion, they also do a few other things really well.

They notify you every time there is a new purchase made on their site. (Timothy Sykes also does a great job with this.)

buyer

buyer


buyer

buyer

And they have different types of exit popups depending where you are on their site.

Some of them sell products:

product

product


product

product

And some focus on collecting emails (they do something smart, which is they ask you a question before asking for your email… typically converts better):

exit email

exit email


exit email

exit email

By showcasing all of these examples from Legion, I am trying to show you that content marketing does convert if you focus on the conversion aspect.

Remember how earlier I talked about how when people go to websites with content they are there to read and learn? That doesn’t mean you can’t convert them into customers. You just have to put in a bit more work than just telling them to buy your product.

Legion grew to 8 figures a year using these tactics, which means it works. Sure, you all know I can do it, but the Legion team isn’t made up of marketers, it is made up of fitness fanatics.

Even Timothy Sykes, he generates 61% of his sales from content marketing. That’s a business that makes well into the millions of dollars per month.

So what’s my secret sauce?

I showed you how Legion monetizes their blog, now I want to show you how I monetize my blog.

I use 5 main channels to convert my content marketing traffic into leads and then my sales team converts those leads into revenue.

But before I go over them, keep in mind this will work if you have a personal blog or a corporate blog. And it will work if you are in B2B, B2C, selling products, collecting leads, or selling a service. In other words, it pretty much works for all blogs. 😉

Let’s go over each of them…

Tactic #1: Exit popups

I showed you my exit popup above and that’s I how I collect most of my emails. Once I collect an email, I send off an email that looks something like this:

[insert first name], as promised, here is the cheat sheet that breaks down how I ranked on page 1 of Google for terms like “online marketing” and “

SEO”. (I hope you enjoy it… I spent a lot of time creating it.)

Just as a heads up, the cheat sheet is advanced, but if you follow it you’ll do well.

It goes over the tactics I personally use and over the next few weeks, I’ll also share a few marketing hacks that you won’t find anywhere else. 😉

Now, if you need more help, feel free and check out my ad agency, Neil Patel Digital, where we can do everything for you.

And if you have any questions, just hit the reply button and ask away. It’s my personal email and I am here to help you.

Seriously, don’t be shy.

Cheers,

Neil Patel

If you look at the email above, you’ll notice that I link to my ad agency.

That email helps collect a solid portion of my qualified leads. It doesn’t bring in the majority, but I’ve found that people on my email list are 278% more likely to turn into customers.

When you collect emails, don’t be afraid to promote your product or service. It doesn’t have to be in your first email, you can do it over time.

For example, Ramit from I Will Teach You to be Rich, usually waits 30 days to promote his products. You typically have to be on his email list for at least 30 days before you see any promotions.

Tactic #2: Lead flow funnel

On NeilPatel.com, you’ll notice that I have a few different URL optins.

On my homepage, I ask you for your URL:

home page

home page


home page

home page

And I push you through an analyzer that looks like this:

analyzer

analyzer


analyzer

analyzer

And then I collect a lead that gets passed to my sales team:

lead form

lead form


lead form

lead form

I have a similar flow on every page. For example, on blog posts, I have a top bar:

top bar

top bar


top bar

top bar

I also have them within the sidebar of my blog posts:

blog sidebar

blog sidebar


blog sidebar

blog sidebar

That simple analyzer that I am pushing traffic to accounts for over 90% of my leads. It works that well. Just look at how much revenue my sales team closed in the last 31 days (I shared it above).

You have to get creative with your funnel. If you are unsure of how to create a funnel, check out this blog post.

Tactic #3: Webinars

Once you are on my email list, you will see the opportunity to join my webinar.

From there I pitch you on my agency. If you are wondering how a webinar funnel works, you should read this blog post as I break it all down in there.

When I used to sell info products, for every 100 webinar registrations I was generating 3.6 sales. Each sale is worth $997. After refunds, the 3.6 sales would turn into $3,050.82.

I eventually ditched the info product webinar and focused on collecting consulting leads.

If you want to see my latest webinar presentation (feel free and use my slides and modify it for your business), you can download them here.

Tactic #4: Thank you pages

Have you seen my thank you page?

Everyone who opts into my email list sees it. I talk about my ad agency in a short video and it helps drive leads.

thank you

thank you


thank you

thank you

Tactic #5: Blog mentions

The last tactic I use to generate sales from content marketing is to just mention my business within my blog post.

How many times do you think I mentioned my ad agency, Neil Patel Digital, in this post?

Probably enough to generate an extra 500 to 1,000 visitors to my agency site.

analytics

analytics


analytics

analytics

The last time I did it, the agency had an all-time high of 970 visitors in one day. That’s not too shabby.

Sometimes it generates qualified leads and other times it doesn’t. But it’s a numbers game.

Conclusion

It’s much easier to grow traffic to a blog than it is to monetize. Content marketing is effective as long as you can drive qualified traffic and you can convert those visitors into customers.

For example, on NeilPatel.com I have a lot of posts about Instagram and how to grow followers. Although this Instagram post is one of my most popular pieces of content… in multiple languages

instagram analytics

instagram analytics


instagram analytics

instagram analytics

Those visitors will never convert into qualified leads.

Before you do any form of content marketing, make sure you are really going after an audience that will buy your products and services.

Once you’ve got the targeting down, then start cranking out content, promoting it and building a community.

In general, it will take you a year to see decent results in traffic. And I would recommend that you avoid monetizing within the first 12 months. You could try to monetize earlier, but I’ve found it to slow down traffic growth.

So, I prefer investing in pure traffic growth during the first year and then slowly transitioning into monetization in year two. And to clarify, I don’t slow down on traffic growth and marketing, instead, I focus on both traffic and conversions.

Do you see why content marketing works for me and not most people? So, what are you waiting for… are you going to implement what you just learned?

Drilling down into Stackdriver Service Monitoring

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ClPlBl/~3/WrZQTBTNOWk/drilling-down-into-stackdriver-service-monitoring.html

Campaign Sites Launching

























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Category: All News, Updates

Louisville, KY – 7/28/2018 – The Committee To Re-Elect Sean Delahanty District Court Division 6 Judge has created two new sites for voters.

The campaign site at https://www.seandelahanty.com will continue to grow in content providing voters with a detailed understanding of Judge Delahanty’s work. The site will expend the campaign’s social media reach include Flickr, Tumblr, Instagram, Google+ and Youtube. Expect several video chats to be released as these next 100 days until the election count down.

The campaign has also launched https://www.seandelahanty.org to help server internal uses for volunteers and donors.

Both sites now offer online donations. Donations can be recurring monthly or one time and the sites allow voters to review their previous donations. Each site is mobile optimized for mobile traffic allowing visitors to keep up with the campaign on any device.

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Sean Delahanty Campaign Site

100 Days Until The Election

While it may seem that we’re just getting into summer, November 6 is 100 days away. With school starting and the holidays approaching don’t forget to prepare for the election by reviewing the candidates.  While there are no national offices on the ballot this November there are a large number of important local races.

logo sean delahanty

logo sean delahanty

Several Metro Council, Judicial and State Legislature Offices will be decided by many of us.  The following candidates will be on the ballot for the office noted.

Registry of Candidates
for the 2018 General Election
on November 6, 2018

COMMONWEALTH’S ATTORNEY
Democratic Party
Thomas B. “Tom” WINE
11308 WOODED BRANCH LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40291-3598
Filed: 11/8/2017

CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
Democratic Party
David Lawrence NICHOLSON
302 CORALBERRY RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-5704
Filed: 11/9/2017

PROPERTY VALUATION ADMINISTRATOR
Democratic Party
Colleen YOUNGER
824 ASH ST
LOUISVILLE, KY 40217
Filed: 1/30/2018
Republican Party
John T. MAY
609 BEDFORDSHIRE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-5510
Filed: 1/30/2018

COUNTY JUDGE/EXECUTIVE
Democratic Party
Queenie AVERETTE
4119 VERMONT AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40211-3110
Filed: 11/8/2017

COUNTY ATTORNEY
Democratic Party
Mike O’CONNELL
204 PLEASANTVIEW AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40206
Filed: 11/9/2017

COUNTY CLERK
Democratic Party
Michael E. BOWMAN
13503 KINROSS BLVD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40272-1337
Filed: 1/30/2018
Republican Party
Barbara “Bobbie” HOLSCLAW
3121 ROYPOM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3044
Filed: 11/8/2017

SHERIFF
Democratic Party
John E. AUBREY
6600 MAYFAIR AVE
PROSPECT, KY 40059
Filed: 11/8/2017
Republican Party
Robert Alan JONES JR.
10401 DUKE CT
FAIRDALE, KY 40118-9480
Filed: 1/8/2018

COUNTY COMMISSIONER – ‘A’ DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Daniel B. GROSSBERG
1100 WINNERS CIR APT 4
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-7547
Filed: 1/30/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 1st DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Jessica GREEN
3536 COTTER DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40211-2167
Filed: 12/13/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 3rd DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Keisha DORSEY
1822 OREGON AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40210-2132
Filed: 11/28/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 5th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Donna Lyvette PURVIS
4621 GARLAND AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40211-2735
Filed: 1/19/2018
Republican Party
John Mark OWEN
620 N 28TH ST
LOUISVILLE, KY 40212
Filed: 1/30/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 7th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Paula McCRANEY
7115 CHIPPENHAM RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6662
Filed: 1/26/2018
Republican Party
Kent HALL
3004 MURRAY HILL PIKE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2962
Filed: 1/8/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 9th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Bill HOLLANDER
202 S PETERSON AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40206-2539
Filed: 11/13/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 11th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Derek Trent ASHCRAFT
9100 RAINTREE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220
Filed: 1/9/2018
Republican Party
Kevin J. KRAMER
2915 WINTERHAVEN RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-2877
Filed: 12/28/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 13th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Mark FOX
505 SAM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40214-6015
Filed: 11/27/2017
Republican Party
Jennifer ALEXANDER
10210 MITCHELL HILL RD
FAIRDALE, KY 40118-9413
Filed: 1/29/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 15th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Kevin TRIPLETT
1307 JONI DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-3970
Filed: 1/30/2018
Republican Party
Richard O. BROWN
1002 BERRY BLVD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40215-2757
Filed: 1/30/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 17th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Markus WINKLER
11711 HAZELWOOD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 12/4/2017
Republican Party
Glen E. STUCKEL
3123 LAKE VISTA DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-4426
Filed: 11/13/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 19th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
William R. ACKERMAN III.
306 WILLOW STONE WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/8/2018
Republican Party
Anthony B. PIAGENTINI
11109 OAKHURST RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40245-5242
Filed: 1/30/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 21st DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Nicole GEORGE
4517 SOUTHERN PKWY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40214-1414
Filed: 11/28/2017
Republican Party
Bret A. SHULTZ
1304 HOWARD ST
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213
Filed: 1/8/2018

METRO COUNCIL – 23rd DISTRICT
Republican Party
James PEDEN
9708 HUNTING GROUND CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-2481
Filed: 12/7/2017

METRO COUNCIL – 25th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
David YATES
8101 BELLA WOODS DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40214-4966
Filed: 1/10/2018
Republican Party
Harold Temoth HENLEY JR.
1609 PARKRIDGE PKWY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40214-4699
Filed: 1/30/2018

CORONER
Democratic Party
Barbara WEAKLEY-JONES
2704 FLAT ROCK RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40245-4860
Filed: 12/20/2017

SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION – BD OF SUPVRS – 3
Non-partisan
Jasmine WOODARD
1476 S 2ND ST
LOUISVILLE, KY 40208
Filed: 1/30/2018
Raymond L. ADAMS SR.
8320 EAGLE CREEK DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222
Filed: 7/26/2018

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 1
Democratic Party
Mera Kathryn CORLETT
2329 GLENMARY AVE APT 1
LOUISVILLE, KY 40204
Filed: 1/19/2018
Republican Party
Shelly Renee CORMNEY
PO Box 6494
LOUISVILLE, KY 40206
Filed: 1/30/2018

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 2
Democratic Party
Gary FIELDS
3127 ORIOLE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1105
Filed: 11/8/2017

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 3
Democratic Party
Angela D. HOLLINGSWORTH
3452 FERN LEA RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-3670
Filed: 1/30/2018

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 1
Democratic Party
Bruce BOGGS JR.
300 EASTWOOD FISHERVILLE RD
FISHERVILLE, KY 40023-8733
Filed: 1/5/2018
Republican Party
John D. ZEHNDER
301 LYNDON LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4603
Filed: 1/11/2018

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 2
Democratic Party
Mike THOMPSON
1324 WELLER AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40208-1074
Filed: 11/27/2017
Republican Party
Virginia WOOLRIDGE
6528 BROOK VALLEY DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-1481
Filed: 1/30/2018

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 3
Democratic Party
Andre THOMAS
310 N 35TH ST
LOUISVILLE, KY 40212-2116
Filed: 1/30/2018

MAYOR
Democratic Party
Greg FISCHER
1715 SPRING DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40205-1324
Filed: 11/30/2017
Republican Party
Angela LEET
1800 MOCKINGBIRD RIDGE PL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1067
Filed: 1/24/2018
Non-partisan
Douglas LATTIMORE
2616 HALE AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40211
Filed: 2/2/2018
Henry OWENS III.
850 W MUHAMMAD ALI BLVD APT 2002
LOUISVILLE, KY 40203-3839
Filed: 4/11/2018
Jackie GREEN
1645 STEVENS AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40205
Filed: 11/9/2017

SCHOOL BOARD – DISTRICT 6
Non-partisan
Angela SMITH
5104 RED OAK LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218
Filed: 3/12/2018
Waymen EDDINGS
4010 POPLAR LEVEL RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213
Filed: 1/5/2018

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL BOARD – 1
Non-partisan
Rosanna GABRIELE
1111 BELLEWOOD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2582
Filed: 7/16/2018

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL BOARD – 2 – Unexpired Term
Non-partisan
Robert T. WATSON
12200 RIDGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2242
Filed: 7/6/2018

ANCHORAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
W. Thomas HEWITT
11104 OWL CREEK LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018

ANCHORAGE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Brian RUBLEIN
11709 EAST OSAGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018
Cecelia HAGAN
1908 EVERGREEN RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018
Diane Valentine COOK
11941 CREEL LODGE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018
Jason WALTERS
11921 CREEL LODGE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-5101
Filed: 11/8/2017
Matthew DELEHANTY
11602 RIDGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2409
Filed: 1/30/2018
Neil RAMSEY
906 EVERGREEN RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018
T. Hunter WILSON
1407 COLD SPRINGS RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/29/2018
William M. WETHERTON
2106 HOMEWOOD DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 1/19/2018

AUDUBON PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Tony WILLIAMS
3220 EAGLE PASS
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1273
Filed: 7/13/2018

AUDUBON PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Andrew J. KLUMP
900 AUDUBON PKWY APT 3
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1311
Filed: 7/16/2018
Madeline Mittel BOZEMAN
3300 ORIOLE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213
Filed: 7/24/2018

BARBOURMEADE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bryan COOMER
3201 BROWNSBORO VISTA DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-2507
Filed: 7/17/2018

BEECHWOOD VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Timothy B. GEORGE JR.
210 BILTMORE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207
Filed: 6/5/2018

BEECHWOOD VILLAGE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Kelly CARLS
206 MARSHALL DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3428
Filed: 5/4/2018
Phyllis SKONICKI
110 MARSHALL DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3426
Filed: 4/10/2018

BELLEMEADE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Susan Dorten JARL
213 BELLEMEADE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4563
Filed: 7/11/2018

BLUE RIDGE MANOR MAYOR
Non-partisan
Carla KREITMAN
10201 RADFORD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-3316
Filed: 7/20/2018

BLUE RIDGE MANOR COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Debbie MILLS
103 SHELBY POINTE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-3150
Filed: 7/2/2018
Porter S. LADY
203 WENHAM WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-3320
Filed: 5/29/2018

BRIARWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Brian K. SUTTON
8707 BEST CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242
Filed: 6/26/2018
Robert TOLER
8615 BIRCH CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3461
Filed: 5/29/2018

BROWNSBORO VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mark W. JOYCE
300 SPRITE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1919
Filed: 7/20/2018

BROWNSBORO VILLAGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Carol McCARTY
400 LOTIS WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1911
Filed: 7/20/2018
Dana Walker LINDLEY
301 SPRITE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1918
Filed: 7/12/2018

CAMBRIDGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Gary OSBORNE
2919 WESTFIELD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-1528
Filed: 6/25/2018
Gayle WILHELMI
2913 CAMBRIDGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-1507
Filed: 6/25/2018
Stuart KING
2906 CAMBRIDGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-1508
Filed: 6/25/2018

CREEKSIDE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Zakirhushain “ZAK” DUGLA
9903 KENMONT LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241
Filed: 7/6/2018

CREEKSIDE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Beverly A. WILLIAMS
9804 KENMONT LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2128
Filed: 7/6/2018
Paul VITELLO
3202 THORNDELL CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2136
Filed: 7/6/2018
Thomas WILSON
3201 THORNDELL CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241
Filed: 7/6/2018

DOUGLASS HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bonnie JUNG
511 CHESKIRK PL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-1702
Filed: 7/12/2018

DOUGLASS HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Denise SCARPELLINI
11010 BRECHIN RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-1804
Filed: 7/12/2018
Patti Walker EUBANKS
806 BOWMORE PL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-1739
Filed: 6/29/2018
William “Bill” MIDDLETON
12410 TAMWORTH CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-4658
Filed: 7/12/2018

DRUID HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ben FRANKLIN
4006 DRUID HILLS RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2020
Filed: 7/19/2018

FOREST HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Kenneth W. GRIFFIN
2213 MAHAN DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1771
Filed: 6/4/2018

FOREST HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Lydia MOEL
9208 AXMINSTER DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1740
Filed: 6/14/2018
Sharon C. DOLL
2302 CHERIAN DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1706
Filed: 6/14/2018
Sharon HENRY
5 NARWOOD DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1745
Filed: 6/14/2018

GRAYMOOR-DEVONDALE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Yvette WINNETTE
1415 TECHNY LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6522
Filed: 6/29/2018

GREEN SPRING MAYOR
Non-partisan
Trevor S. CRAVENS
4422 DEEPWOOD DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-1047
Filed: 7/11/2018

GREEN SPRING COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Chris VON ALLMEN
7004 QUAIL BRACE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-1011
Filed: 7/11/2018
Stuart W. RIES
7392 WOLFSPRING TRCE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-1056
Filed: 6/25/2018
T. E. “Tom” PHILLIPS
7103 GREENGATE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241
Filed: 7/18/2018

HERITAGE CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Clifford “Larry” WEBB
11400 COURAGE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-2568
Filed: 7/17/2018

HERITAGE CREEK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Benny WARFORD
11405 COURAGE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-2568
Filed: 7/17/2018
Billy MITCHELL
8801 TEMPERATE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-1701
Filed: 7/17/2018
John BENZ
8723 WISDOM LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-2567
Filed: 7/17/2018
Joseph “Joe” SOEDER
8512 DILIGENT WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-5507
Filed: 7/17/2018
Mary Jean WHITEHOUSE
8807 PERSISTENCE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-2590
Filed: 7/17/2018
Tammy Lee LLOYD
8708 DESTINY CV
LOUISVILLE, KY 40229-2556
Filed: 7/17/2018

HILLS AND DALES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ralph George JOHANSON
3209 MOUNT RAINIER DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-6266
Filed: 7/20/2018

HOLLOW CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ken WOODBURN
6606 HOLLOW TREE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-1338
Filed: 7/17/2018

HOLLOW CREEK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Bruce SAYLOR
7304 CREEKVIEW CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-1303
Filed: 7/19/2018
Greg BLUM
7411 SWITCH BARK RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-1350
Filed: 7/17/2018
Lois KITTEL
6902 DOWNS BRANCH RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40228-1323
Filed: 7/17/2018

HOUSTON ACRES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Charles BARTMAN
4302 MARTHA AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3508
Filed: 6/29/2018

HOUSTON ACRES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Harvey HARDISON
3122 MICHAEL DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3512
Filed: 6/29/2018
Mia Theresa SEITZ
3105 MICHAEL DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3511
Filed: 6/29/2018
Scott MEDLEY
4218 HEWITT AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3559
Filed: 6/29/2018
Steven SCHLOTTER
3122 HOUSTON BLVD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-2210
Filed: 6/29/2018

HURSTBOURNE MAYOR
Non-partisan
George STEWART
9103 NOTTINGHAM PKWY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222
Filed: 1/29/2018

HURSTBOURNE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Bennie “Ben” JACKSON
8716 LINN STATION RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-5655
Filed: 7/25/2018

INDIAN HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Frederick “Chip” HANCOCK
160 WESTWIND RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1545
Filed: 7/23/2018

INDIAN HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Frank P. DOHENY JR.
143 WESTWIND RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1545
Filed: 7/20/2018
James A. GIESEL
196 WESTWIND RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1550
Filed: 7/20/2018
James Philip “Jim” GRIES
5303 HEMPSTEAD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1246
Filed: 7/20/2018
Jason Alexander KRON
94 WARRIOR RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1518
Filed: 7/20/2018
Laura J. DUNBAR
36 ARROWHEAD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1537
Filed: 7/20/2018
Lee K. GARLOVE
2008 INDIAN CHUTE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1185
Filed: 7/20/2018
Mary “Mimi” ZINNIEL
17 RIO VISTA DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1510
Filed: 7/25/2018
Sandra CARROLL
5802 APACHE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1761
Filed: 7/20/2018
Stephen L. GRUEBBEL
2107 RUDY LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1205
Filed: 7/20/2018

JEFFERSONTOWN MAYOR
Non-partisan
William “Bill” DIERUF
613 TURNSTILE TRCE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 11/29/2017

JEFFERSONTOWN COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Bill YOUNG
8605 LAMBACH LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-3480
Filed: 12/21/2017
Brian ABRAMS
10904 Vantage View Ct
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299
Filed: 12/5/2017
Carol PIKE
4007 CHESLEY MARTIN DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-6826
Filed: 1/19/2018
Christopher SMITH
4500 STONY BROOK DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1117
Filed: 1/29/2018
Kevin RICH
3311 MCADAMS CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1580
Filed: 1/30/2018
Mark BLUM
2604 OLD HICKORY RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-2835
Filed: 12/7/2017
Pam WARE
9803 Fairground Rd.
LOUISVILLE, KY 40291-1060
Filed: 1/19/2018
Ray “Chubby Ray” PERKINS
9902 TAYLORSVILLE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299
Filed: 1/29/2018
Ron POWELL
4311 GIBRALTAR DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-5808
Filed: 1/29/2018
Tim HALL
9414 JO CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1192
Filed: 1/17/2018
Vincent GRISANTI
9603 WATTERSON TRL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-3450
Filed: 12/14/2017
Warren DONALDSON
8807 HALFORD WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40299-1112
Filed: 1/29/2018

KINGSLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cindy LANDRY
2506 TAYLORSVILLE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40205-2236
Filed: 5/24/2018

LANGDON PLACE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mike FRANK
2808 KOSMAR CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-2401
Filed: 6/22/2018

LANGDON PLACE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Aaron HARDY
2806 KOSMAR CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-2401
Filed: 6/12/2018
Charles R. OBryan
2611 KENNERSLEY DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3275
Filed: 7/6/2018

LINCOLNSHIRE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Emil PETER III.
18 PEMBROKE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-1233
Filed: 5/30/2018

LYNDON MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brent HAGAN
1323 WHIRLAWAY DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3642
Filed: 2/7/2018

LYNDON COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Amy L. STUBER
204 WOOD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4616
Filed: 1/12/2018
Camille POPHAM
1505 STONEWALL WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3633
Filed: 7/20/2018
Carla S. NALLEY
1526 STONEWALL WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3650
Filed: 7/20/2018
Elizabeth KRAMER
410 WOOD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4850
Filed: 7/17/2018
Mardy SIDEBOTTOM
7901 NEW LA GRANGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4835
Filed: 4/30/2018
Susan M. BARTO
325 WOOD RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4661
Filed: 7/9/2018

LYNNVIEW MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ann GLENN
4825 REDSTART RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-2157
Filed: 7/25/2018

LYNNVIEW COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Deborah OSBORN
4905 RAVEN RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213
Filed: 7/11/2018
Derek S. CARR
4823 REDWING WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-2323
Filed: 7/23/2018
Floyd “Randell” MATTHEWS
4830 PARTRIDGE RUN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213
Filed: 7/11/2018
Jesse D. PRUITT
1213 PIGEON PASS RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-2315
Filed: 7/10/2018
Linda PLAPPERT
4807 BLUEBIRD AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-2301
Filed: 7/11/2018
Suzanne STARK
4839 REDSTART RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-2157
Filed: 7/24/2018

MANOR CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
John YOUNG
3501 REMS RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2526
Filed: 5/23/2018

MANOR CREEK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Clelland RUSSELL
3502 REMS CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2525
Filed: 7/12/2018

MEADOW VALE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mary R. HORNEK
9711 BOXFORD WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242
Filed: 6/19/2018
Matt HAMMOND
9818 GRENFELL WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-2347
Filed: 3/30/2018

MEADOW VALE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cathy MORROW
9802 BOXFORD CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242
Filed: 7/23/2018
Mary “Diane” ROBERTS
9601 SOMERFORD CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-2322
Filed: 7/13/2018

MIDDLETOWN MAYOR
Non-partisan
Todd ROLOW
14013 WATERS EDGE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40245
Filed: 1/19/2018

MOCKINGBIRD VALLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
David T. RICHARDSON
612 CLUB LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1409
Filed: 7/19/2018
Mark L. CORBETT
511 JARVIS LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1341
Filed: 7/13/2018
Richard A. LECHLEITER
601 CLUB LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1408
Filed: 6/28/2018

NORBOURNE ESTATES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Albert W. ERNY
4034 SAINT GERMAINE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3810
Filed: 7/26/2018
Elena B. MARQUETTE
321 S SHERRIN AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3815
Filed: 7/26/2018
Jeffrey M. DAIBER
4001 SAINT IVES CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207
Filed: 7/17/2018
Kevin M. THOMAS
326 MERIDIAN AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3848
Filed: 7/26/2018

NORTHFIELD COUNCIL
Non-partisan
Clark RHEA
2308 NEWMARKET DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6318
Filed: 7/27/2018
James “Tracy” WALKER
6106 BAYLOR CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6147
Filed: 7/25/2018
Sharon BERGER
6001 FOX CREEK CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6332
Filed: 6/5/2018
Steve LEVY
2249 WYNNEWOOD CIR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-6341
Filed: 6/15/2018

PROSPECT MAYOR
Non-partisan
John E. EVANS
8101 MONTERO DR
PROSPECT, KY 40059-8703
Filed: 1/11/2018
Scott WHITEHOUSE
7509 HUNTING CREEK DR
PROSPECT, KY 40059
Filed: 7/27/2018
William W. TERRY
6701 GUNPOWDER LN
PROSPECT, KY 40059
Filed: 7/27/2018

PROSPECT COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Frank FULCHER
6914 WYTHE HILL CIR
PROSPECT, KY 40059
Filed: 6/13/2018
Gregory HUELSMAN
7210 HUNTERS RUN DR
PROSPECT, KY 40059-8830
Filed: 6/21/2018
Harold SCHEWE
6912 WYTHE HILL CIR
PROSPECT, KY 40059
Filed: 6/13/2018
Rande Nortof SWANN
6701 JOHN HANCOCK PL
PROSPECT, KY 40059-9433
Filed: 6/13/2018
Richard OVERY
18 AUTUMN HILL CT
PROSPECT, KY 40059-9459
Filed: 6/13/2018
Sandra Cerow LEONARD
7302 EDGEMORE PL
PROSPECT, KY 40059-7802
Filed: 6/13/2018

ROLLING FIELDS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cyrus RADFORD
3727 FAIRWAY LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1414
Filed: 7/18/2018

ROLLING HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
J. Brent MONROE
9207 AYLESBURY DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3306
Filed: 7/24/2018

SAINT MATTHEWS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Richard J. TONINI
3608 SAINT GERMAINE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-3722
Filed: 6/11/2018

SAINT MATTHEWS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Bernard BOWLING JR.
3814 HYCLIFFE AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207
Filed: 7/12/2018
Frank A. FLYNN
3609 GRAHAM RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-4324
Filed: 7/20/2018
Mary Jo Garvey NAY
430 VIRGINIA AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40222-4722
Filed: 6/19/2018
Robert C. ORR
4011 SPRINGHILL RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-4517
Filed: 7/18/2018
Shaun P McKIERNAN
4028 BROOKFIELD AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2004
Filed: 7/26/2018
Stuart MONOHAN
4034 LELAND RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2008
Filed: 7/24/2018
Tony G. WEITER
4022 BROWNLEE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-4532
Filed: 6/19/2018

SAINT REGIS PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brandt DAVIS
4311 MOUNT VERNON RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220
Filed: 6/12/2018

SAINT REGIS PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Jeffrey WEIS
2515 FOXY POISE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40220-1032
Filed: 7/5/2018

SHIVELY MAYOR
Democratic Party
Beverly Chester BURTON
2112 EAST LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-3746
Filed: 11/9/2017

SHIVELY COUNCILMEMBER
Democratic Party
Chester L. BURRELL
3808 Dixie Hwy
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216
Filed: 1/22/2018
Delbert R. VANCE
3424 FERN LEA RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-3670
Filed: 1/8/2018
Lisa BEARD
2100 MIDDLE LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216
Filed: 1/30/2018
Maria D. JOHNSON
1918 NELSON AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-5224
Filed: 1/30/2018
Shanell R. THOMPSON
2221 PEASLEE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-4835
Filed: 1/25/2018
Tiffany M. BURTON
3505 Janell Road
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216
Filed: 1/29/2018
Republican Party
Dennis STENGEL
4708 SPEN LEA RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40216-2845
Filed: 1/24/2018

SPRING VALLEY MAYOR
Non-partisan
J. Patrick LONG
7400 LANFAIR DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2717
Filed: 7/17/2018

SPRING VALLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Gregory J. WAKELING
3216 HADDON RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241-2760
Filed: 7/17/2018
Michael J. MOYANO
7404 LANFAIR DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241
Filed: 7/17/2018
R. Scott McCORKLE
7517 LANFAIR DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40241
Filed: 7/17/2018

STRATHMOOR VILLAGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
John BARROW
2235 EMERSON AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40205-2610
Filed: 5/18/2018
Timothy G. SCHROERING
2312 WINSTON AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40205-2643
Filed: 7/20/2018

SYCAMORE MAYOR
Non-partisan
James BARR
10601 SYCAMORE TRL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 7/27/2018

SYCAMORE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Amy P. WILLIAMS
10603 SYCAMORE WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2948
Filed: 7/27/2018
Anne HESS
107 SYCAMORE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2940
Filed: 7/27/2018
Sally FANGMAN
121 SYCAMORE DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223
Filed: 7/27/2018
Virginia FORESMAN
10608 SYCAMORE CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2939
Filed: 7/27/2018

WATTERSON PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Linda CHESSER
4308 CONAEM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1909
Filed: 6/14/2018

WATTERSON PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Gina GARRETT
4316 CONAEM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1909
Filed: 7/3/2018
Helen Jo ARNOLD
4311 CONAEM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1908
Filed: 6/14/2018
Marlene A. WELSH
1723 LARKMOOR LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218-3011
Filed: 6/27/2018
Phillip JOHNSON
4315 CONAEM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1908
Filed: 7/23/2018
Steven L. FORTWENGLER
1708 LARKMOOR LN
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218
Filed: 6/27/2018
Tiffany WOODSON
4315 ANNSHIRE AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40213-1904
Filed: 7/3/2018

WEST BUECHEL MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brenda Kay MOORE
3737 MARVIN AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218-2568
Filed: 7/24/2018
Joseph MATTINGLY
3740 ETHEL AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218
Filed: 7/19/2018

WEST BUECHEL COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Ashley STEWART
3722 BASHFORD AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218
Filed: 7/25/2018
Billy HILL
3704 MARVIN AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218-2520
Filed: 7/24/2018
Bonnie MANNING
3732 MARVIN AVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40218-2567
Filed: 7/24/2018

WESTWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Nancy LAMBERT
9004 BINGHAM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242
Filed: 7/24/2018

WESTWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Richard WATKINS
9000 BINGHAM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3311
Filed: 7/24/2018
Robert PURDY
2208 WESTRIDGE RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3353
Filed: 7/26/2018
Robert S. OAKLEY
9021 BINGHAM DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40242-3310
Filed: 7/11/2018

WILDWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Phillip W. MYERS
117 TANGLEWOOD TRL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40223-2815
Filed: 2/5/2018

WINDY HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Helen M. DAVIS
732 WICKLOW RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-1759
Filed: 7/10/2018
Michael B. LUBEACH
1110 CHAMBERLAIN HILL RD APT 228
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2291
Filed: 6/11/2018

WINDY HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Kate Kirwan GREER
2514 WINDY WAY
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2320
Filed: 7/10/2018
Suzanne SPENCER
907 WINDSONG PL
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2289
Filed: 7/11/2018

WOODLAND HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Michael J. F. OCHS
302 WESTWOOD DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-2043
Filed: 12/11/2017

WOODLAND HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
David W. TILFORD
502 WESTWOOD DR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-2047
Filed: 7/18/2018
Ronnie G. COX JR.
12317 HARDWICK RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243
Filed: 7/9/2018
Sally M. TILFORD
502 WESTWOOD DRIVE
LOUISVILLE, KY 40243-2047
Filed: 7/18/2018

WOODLAWN PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
George LANGFORD
6845 GREEN MEADOW CIR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2849
Filed: 7/26/2018
Gregory CLAYPOOL
4318 KINLOCH RD
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2854
Filed: 7/20/2018
Thomas M. NUNN
6914 AMBRIDGE CIR
LOUISVILLE, KY 40207-2458
Filed: 7/10/2018

WORTHINGTON HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bob STONUM
4518 PULASKI CT
LOUISVILLE, KY 40245-1839
Filed: 5/31/2018

Sean Delahanty Campaign Site

SEO Backlinks: Guest Blogging Sites

guest blogging

guest blogging

guest blogging

guest blogging

After you’ve tried writing on your own site and all you pulled in was your mother and an aunt it may be time to try taking your message on the road.  Guest blogging involves you writing content but rather than posting it where no one will see you post unique content as a guest writer to a more popular blog hoping it brings attention to your own site through backlinks.

I havent actually tried this yet but I can see its usefulness if you can gain a do follow link.

Here are some lists of sites that accept guest writers that I borrow from https://www.effectivebusinessideas.com

If I actually gain some posts and backlinks from this list, I’ll update ya here.  Some say SEO Guest Blogging is dead, but maybe bad content guest blogging is dead?  We shall see.

Freelance Blogs

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.43

Alexa rank: 18,184

How to Submit Guest Post:

Get an idea of the writing style and read previously published guest posts before writing your article. Read the Guest Post page for guidelines on writing and terms of being a guest writer. To submit, contact Onibalusi via the contact page. You’ll be allowed to link to relevant sources in the article as well as a link back to your blog/website in your author byline. In order for your article to be published on YoungPrePro, it must be creative and detailed.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 4.74

Alexa rank: 165,401

How to Submit Guest Post: Browse through the archives and read the guest post page to know the guidelines and writing style. To submit your guest post, send the completed article (not a pitch) to Yuwanda via the email address provided on that page. Articles on first-hand experience work well on this blog.  

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.16

Alexa rank: 198,788

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guest post page before submitting your article. Ensure you send a pitch first containing the proposed title as well as a description of your article and a bio before submitting the full article. Upon publishing, you will be allowed to link to your site in the author bio. Send your pitch to Melissa via the email address or use the contact form provided on that page.

Pagerank: 1

Mozrank: 5.72

Alexa rank: 196,674

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guest post guidelines page for direction on submission and content creation. To submit, send your pitch or complete guest article to the email address provided on that page. You will be allowed an author bio with three relevant links.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.84

Alexa rank: 17,978

How To Submit Guest Post: Read previously published guest posts on this blog to have an idea of what is accepted. Visit the contributor guidelines page for more information on writing and formatting your guest post. Send your pitch or complete article to the email address provided on that page with the subject, “Write for Freelance Folder”. You will be entitled to an author bio with a link back to your site.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.54

Alexa rank: 50,534

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guidelines page and submit your completed guest article via the contact form on that page. You are allowed multiple links in your article and are required to link to already published content on the blog. You must be a member of My Blog Guest before you can contribute to this blog.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 5.30

Alexa rank: 83,235

How to Submit Guest Post: To submit a guest post to this blog, you must first become a subscriber and read its content for a while. Read the guest blogging guidelines and submit proposed headlines as well as an outline of your article to the email address provided on that page. Contributing to Make A Living Writing attracts monetary benefits.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 6.30

Alexa rank: 7,798

How to Submit Guest Post: Before you hit the “Submit” button, read the Freelance Switch Contributor page. If your post is accepted, you will be granted rights to republish extracts of it anywhere online. Tutorial and list posts work best on this blog.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.52

Alexa rank: 166,195

How to Submit Guest Post: Know the kind of content that works on this blog first and read the guest blogging page. Send you pitch (not complete article) via the contact form. Your pitch should only contain the proposed headline with one paragraph. You will have the rights to republish the post on your blog after 60 days.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.30

Alexa rank: 178,312

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guest posting page and browse the archives before writing your guest post. Send your pitch to Linda via the email address provided on that page. You will be allowed to link to your blog from your author bio.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.76

Alexa rank: 7,523

How to Submit Guest Post: Browse the blog and read the guest post guidelines page before writing your post. To submit, send your pitch via the contact form on that page or follow the directions on the guidelines page if you’re submitting a complete article. You will be allowed an author bio with a backlink to your site.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.66

Alexa rank: 52,555

How to Submit Guest Post: Study the style of writing and read the guest posts page for guidelines. Send your pitch to the chief editor- Mary Jaksh via the email address provided. You will be allowed to link to your blog in your bio.

Pagerank: 5

Mozrank: 6.00

Alexa rank: 2,180

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the contributor page for guidelines on what to write about. Send a pitch along with samples of your writing by filling the contact form on that page. You will be allowed a byline and you can link to your preferred social networks.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.53

Alexa rank: 179,509

How to Submit Guest Post: Study published articles on the blog and read the guest posting page for guidelines. To submit, send your pitch via the contact page.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.41

Alexa rank: 199,581

How to Submit Guest Post: Browse through the blog and read the guest posts page before writing your article. You can send a pitch or the complete article to Anne’s email address on the contact page and include the words, “Guest Post” in your subject line. You will be allowed a bio and links to your blog.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.13

Alexa rank: 165,910

How to Submit Guest Post: Read through the archives, categories and the guidelines page before writing your post. Send a pitch via the contact page to the email address linked to from the guidelines page. You will be allowed a backlink to your blog via your author bio.

Pagerank: 1

Mozrank: 4.24

Alexa rank: 199,439

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guidelines page and read published articles on the blog before writing your post. You’ll need to be a registered member before submitting your complete guest article.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 6.23

Alexa rank: 70,987

How to Submit Guest Post: Read through previous articles on the blog to know the writing style. Visit the Guest Post page for guidelines on how to write and format your article so as to get your post accepted. To submit, fill out the form on the contact page and attach your guest post. Take note of the secret password mentioned on the guidelines page because you must include it in your subject line. You’ll be allowed a link back to your site from your bio box. The audience of Men With Pens are advanced so avoid writing beginner level articles as this will reduce the chances of your article getting accepted.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.78

Alexa rank: 41,221

How to Submit Guest Post: Browse through the archives and read published guest posts before writing your article. Visit the contributor page for guidelines on writing and submitting your post. Use the drop down in the contact menu to apply as a guest writer. You’ll be allowed to link back to your site from your author bio. If you’re crazy about design, this creative blog is for you.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.81

Alexa rank: 92,322

How to Submit Guest Post: Read published articles on the blog and visit the guest blogging page. To submit, register as a user and fill out your profile. Afterwards, use the contact form on the guidelines page to send your profile information, including your guest post idea. Once you are upgraded to contributor status, submit your article. You will be allowed three backlinks in your author bio and you can republish the post on your blog after one week of it being on Opportunities Planet.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 4.11

Alexa rank: 59,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: All posts must be original and the word count should be 650 words minimum. If your post is accepted you’ll be given full credit and a link to your website. Fill out the form on this page where you’ll also find more information on submitting guest posts.

Pagerank:  6

Mozrank:  6.58

Alexa rank:  7,555

How to Submit a Guest Post: Your post should offer clear advice, how-to-tips and takeaways about marketing. The word count is 800 – 1000 approximately. Here is an example of the types of posts they’re looking for. Email your general marketing post topics  to Veronica Jarski the Editor. Read the write for us page which has a lot more information about submitting guest posts.  

Pagerank: 5

Mozrank: 6.01

Alexa rank: 8,227

How to Submit a Guest Post: Although you’ve got the option of writing about any topic, your article is more likely to get published if it’s about making money online. Articles should be unique, good quality and original. Email your guest post for consideration. This page has more information about submitting guest posts.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  4.67

Alexa rank:  106,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: You should have at least two years experience in internet marketing so that you are familiar with what you’re writing about. This blog prefers articles related to internet marketing. Topics can include article marketing, affiliate marketing, email marketing, social networking etc. Submit your guest post by email for consideration. More information is available on the write for us page.

Pagerank:  5

Mozrank:  4.87

Alexa rank: 81,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Articles should be about marketing and add value to readers. They should be able to put the tips/advice into action straight away. They should be exclusively written for this blog. Include one or two keywords. Submit your post here for consideration. Make sure to read the full guest post guidelines before submitting your post.

 

Pagerank: 6

Mozrank: 6.54

Alexa rank: 15,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: The most important thing about getting accepted on this blog is writing original content which have something new for the readers. Don’t write an opinion-based post. They should be researched, with charts, data and expert quotes. Study the write a guest post guidelines page because there are strict conditions to fulfil. Submit your guest post ideas through the contact us page.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 4.81

Alexa rank: 96,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Articles should be related to make money online with a minimum of 400 words. They should be written exclusively for this blog. You’re allowed two links. Request your user name on the contact us page. Read the guest blogger guideline for more details.

 

Pagerank:  2

Mozrank:  4.81

Alexa rank:  184,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: This blog is looking for new ideas that other bloggers are not using. Posts should be written to entice readers to share on social networks. Topics should be related to online marketing to include traffic generation, SEO, affiliate marketing and social media. The word count is 700 – 1200. You can link back to your blog/website. Complete the form on this page to get started. All the information you need about their guest posting guidelines are also on that page.

 

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 4.44

Alexa rank: 74,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: You’ll get preferential treatment if you become a  customer of this blog. They’re looking for articles on internet marketing, PPC, email marketing, social media and SEO. This page will give you a guide for possible topics. If you’ve written your article email it to Apex. Otherwise email at least two topics with an outline of the content. Please read the write for us page for more information.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 4.85

Alexa rank: 26,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Check out the categories and archives for the types of articles written on this blog. Before you submit your article ideas, read ‘What Guest Blogging is Not’ and follow the guidelines. Register for a contributor account. You’re allowed one link back to your blog. The minimum words for articles should be between 300 – 350. The guest post guidelines have more information about article submission.

 

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.01

Alexa rank: 55,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Articles should be original and all links must be cited in the resource section. The word count is 600 minimum. Link internally to a minimum of two articles that are relevant to your post. You will be rewarded with a stayonsearch contributor badge for your blog. Your post will also be promoted on social media sites. Fill in the guest post request form on this page, which has all the information you need about guest posting.

 

Pagerank: 6

Mozrank: 5.84

Alexa rank: 7,300

How to Submit a Guest Post: This blog is looking for internet marketers to contribute guest posts. They’re interested in case studies, tips and best practices from experienced writers. Posts should be about internet marketing, content marketing, SEO etc. Articles should teach their readers and improve their work. Send an email to the community manager at Raven Tools with your pitch. More information is available on the guest post page.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 5.66

Alexa rank: 119,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Read the blog posts on this blog to get an idea of the types of posts they publish. They will accept posts on online marketing and SEO etc. Minimum word count is 350. Posts must be original and you’re allowed two links. Submit your guest post by email. More information is available on the guest posting page.

 

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.60

Alexa rank: 167,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: This blog is looking for writers to contribute guest posts about four to six times per month. The target groups of the articles are business owners. Topics include marketing analytics, inbound marketing, SEO, lead generation, social media etc.   The word count is 600 words and preferably written in list format. Send links to your articles through the contact page stating how many posts you can contribute each month. More information is available here.

 

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 6.53

Alexa rank: 3,092

How to Submit a Guest Post: This blog accepts guest post about making money online. They’re looking for fresh perspectives, new ideas and innovative approaches. They should be written exclusively for Problogger. Posts on practical tips and how-tos are preferred. You can decide on the length of your article. Send your questions via the contact form. Please read the suggestions for guest posting to get all the information you need before submitting a post.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.41

Alexa rank: 128,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: All content must be within the niche of this blog. Some of the topics are making money online, SEO and online earning. The minimum word count is 300 and you’re not limited to the maximum. You’re allowed one do follow link to your blog. Fill in the form on the guest blogging page, which also has more information about submitting posts.

 

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.53

Alexa rank: 88,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Articles should be useful to the readers. Topics should be about making money online, internet marketing, social media and SEO etc. The minimum word count is 400. Posts should be original and you’re allowed one do follow link. Register first to get your post approved. Read the write for us page for more information.

 

Pagerank: 1

Mozrank: 4.14

Alexa rank: 152,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: If you’re interested in making money online and internet marketing, send an email with your ideas. Write ‘Guest Post’ in the subject line. You could write an opinion based article, post a video or share an infographic on this blog. More information is available on this page.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 4.90

Alexa rank: 74,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: All articles must be related to internet marketing, SEO,digital marketing, social media etc. Minimum word count is 400. Check out this guest post for ideas ‘The Most Important Aspects of any Article Marketing Campaign’. Check out the guest authors section as well. Follow the guidelines and send your guest post by email for consideration.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 4.81

Alexa rank: 91,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Your post should be written exclusively for this blog but can be published on your blog one week after it’s gone live. Register as a member first. Introduce yourself via the contact form with information about yourself, your guest post ideas, your byline and blog’s url. Your account will then be updated for you to contribute your post for review. More information is available on the write for us page.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.98

Alexa rank: 131,938

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guidelines on the guest post page to know what is required of your guest post. Send your guest post via the email provided on that page. You will only be allowed one do-follow backlink in your author bio as well as links to your social network profiles. List articles with lots of points work best on this blog.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.07

Alexa rank: 84,835

How to Submit Guest Post: Read previous articles on this blog before writing your guest post. Visit the guest post page and click through to their Contact Us page to let them know about your guest posting intentions.  

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 5.11

Alexa rank: 197,914

How to Submit Guest Post: If you love adventure and have a specific place you would like to write about, this is the blog to guest post on. Visit their guest post page to know what is expected from you. Afterwards, send your pitch via the contact page or as a direct message on Twitter to the profile provided on that page.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.69

Alexa rank: 191,326

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guest post guidelines page to know the kinds of articles that are accepted. Afterwards, send your pitch to the form on that page. You are entitled to two backlinks in your article and an author bio.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.55

Alexa rank: 430,000

To submit a guest post head on over to the write for us page. Simply fill in the form with your idea and they will get back to you. THey allow 2 links in the article.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.35

Alexa rank: 164,255

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guidelines page to know what their article terms are. Ensure you complete your guest post before submitting it to the email address specified on that page. A combination of narrative and service articles work best on this blog. Writing about a first-hand travel experience is a plus.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 5.20

Alexa rank: 191,015

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the contributor page for guidelines on how to write and submit your guest post. Browse through the blog categories and send your pitch via the contact form on that page. Before becoming a guest writer, you’d have to sign a simple Writer’s Agreement. You will be allowed a link back to your blog in your author bio.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.40

Alexa rank: 80,510

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guidelines page to be clear on their style of writing and what is expected from you as a guest writer. To submit, you need to send a short paragraph explaining what you’ve written or plan on writing to the email provided on that page. Once published, you will be entitled to an author page and bio with links to your site and social media profiles.

Pagerank: 4

Mozrank: 5.44

Alexa rank: 198,936

How to Submit Guest Post: Read through the blog to familiarize yourself with the content. Afterwards, send your pitch to the email of the respective editor specified on the guidelines page. You will be allowed an author bio with a link back to your site.

Pagerank: 1

Mozrank: 5.33

Alexa rank: 135,921

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guest post guidelines page and published articles on the blog before writing your guest post. Use the contact form on the guidelines page to submit your pitch.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.55

Alexa rank: 61,898

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guidelines page to know the article terms. To submit, send your pitch or complete post to the blog owner via the contact page which is linked to from the guidelines page. Ensure your post is top notch because not many guest posts are published on this blog.

Pagerank: 1

Mozrank: 5.52

Alexa rank: 5,214

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guest post page to know the categories of articles that are accepted. To guest post, send your pitch along with a link to a writing sample via the contact form on that page.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.29

Alexa rank: 83,214

How to Submit Guest Post: Visit the guest post guidelines page to know that kinds of articles that are accepted. Send your guest post idea to the email address provided on that page. You’ll be allowed to link to your site only from your author bio.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.23

Alexa rank: 124,551

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the writer guidelines page for instructions on how or what to write on. Send your pitch or ideas to the email address provided on that page. You can have multiple links in your article, as long as they are relevant.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.76

Alexa rank: 114,126

How to Submit Guest Post: Read through the blog before writing your guest post. Visit the guidelines page and submit your guest post to the email address provided. Ensure you paste your complete guest article into the body of the email. Do not send it as an attachment.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.22

Alexa rank: 128,461

How to Submit Guest Post:  Browse the blog archives to familiarize yourself with its content. To submit, visit the submit articles page and fill out the form. You can also register as a user on the blog.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 4.37

Alexa rank: 198,885

How to Submit Guest Post: read the guidelines on the guest post page to know the accepted article categories. Submit your guest post to the provided email address in the formats specified on that page. You will be allowed to link back to your blog.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 6.10

Alexa rank: 12,439

How to Submit Guest Post: Read previously published articles on the blog to know the kinds of articles that are accepted. Send your pitch to the email address specified on the guest post page. You will be entitled to a backlink to your site.

Pagerank: 2

Mozrank: 5.14

Alexa rank: 88,932

How to Submit Guest Post: before writing your guest post, familiarize yourself with the published articles on the blog. Read the guidelines on the guest post page for details on how to submit. You’ll be required to sign up in order to submit your article and are entitled to a profile and a backlink to your site.

Pagerank: 3

Mozrank: 5.50

Alexa rank: 36,216

How to Submit Guest Post: Read the guidelines on the guest blogging page before writing your article. To get your guest post accepted, ensure you are an active member of the community. Submit your article via the contact page linked to from the guidelines page. You will be entitled to two links back to your site in your author bio.

Pagerank: 3
Mozrank: 4.8
Alexa rank: 239,016

How to submit a guest post: TrekWorld is a travel and trekking magazine seeking articles, videos and photos devoted to adventure, advice and inspiration. Visit the contributor guidelines page for sample post ideas and how to query.

Blogs About Blogging

Pagerank: 6

Mozrank: 6.53

Alexa rank: 3,000

How to Submit a Guest Post: Your post must offer quality and practical advice for the ProBlogger readers. It should be written exclusively for ProBlogger, include a headline, body text and byline. Consider these topics for your post; blog SEO, blog design, WordPress tips and tricks and monetization tactics and case studies. Write how-to and practical tips posts to educate readers on improving their blogging skills. Read this page for guidelines and submissions.

Pagerank: 6

Mozrank: 6.45

Alexa rank: 5,600

How to Submit a Guest Post: Post should be useful for the readers. This blog accepts posts connected to blogging, internet marketing or from  your own personal experiences. The minimum word count is 400. Your post should be original. You’re allowed one link to your website, which should be formatted. Send an email with your post inserted in the body or as a .doc attachment. More information on guest post guidelines can be found here.  

PS. Problogger.net and DailyBlogTips.com stopped accepting guest posts in 2013.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank: 5.70

Alexa rank: 9,400

How to Submit a Guest Post: Register for an account. If everything is in order your account will be upgraded so that you can submit your post for review. Write a unique post using headings and subheadings. The word count is 300 to 1400 plus. You’re limited to 4 informative and relevant links but don’t include any affiliate links. Complete the contact us form with your questions.

Pagerank:  5

Mozrank:  4.4

Alexa rank: 83,000

Guidelines: Post has to be 1200 words long and link to other relevant resources. It should also be related to blogging and it has to have 1 picture inside it. Bio box will be included with 2-3 sentences

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  4.87

Alexa rank: 49,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Register for an account and complete your bio. Study the blog to make sure that your post fits within the niche topics. The minimum length is 500 words. Send your post idea via the contact us form. If it’s accepted, your account will be upgraded. More information is available from the write for us page.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  5.34

Alexa rank: 4,900

How to Submit a Guest Post: This blog is considered one of the top Indian blogs on blogging. Some of the topics they cover are blogging, SEO, WordPress and make money online. If your guest post is accepted, you can make money from their Adsense revenue sharing program. Articles should be relevant and you can include videos in your posts. Submit your post after creating an account via the WordPress dashboard or by email. Use the contact us form for your questions. Read the guest post guidelines here.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  5.25

Alexa rank: 25,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Your post should be written exclusively for this blog and be well structured. Simple list posts that don’t share relevant knowledge will not be accepted. Some of the popular topics are blogging, internet marketing, social media and SEO. Study the guest posts already published on this blog. Read the write for us page for more information on guest posts guidelines.

Pagerank:  5

Mozrank:  5.85

Alexa rank: 9,800

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Fill in the contact form to be considered for submitting guest posts to this blog. Supply background information about yourself, your writing experiences,  your blog and article topic ideas. Give details of your blog or link to some of the articles you’ve written. Here is an example of a published guest post. Check out the write for us page for more details.

Pagerank:  5

Mozrank:  6.05

Alexa rank: 46,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Fill in the contact us form to show your interest in writing for this blog. Give details of your topics and article ideas. Include links to some of your writing. If accepted, a link will be sent to you for registration. Posts should be unique with a minimum word count of 700. More information is available here.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  5.31

Alexa rank: 34,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  This blog is looking for actionable tips. Before you write, check the blog to make sure that the tips haven’t been covered already. You can link to your blog and social media sites. Include screen shots in your posts. There’s no minimum word count. Read the guest posting policy here.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  5.50

Alexa rank: 49,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  If you can write practical tutorials and offer useful advice that’s useful and original, you’ll stand a good chance of getting published on this blog. Read  learn how to blog to get an indication of the types of posts to write. Fill in the form on this page with your guest post ideas.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  5.21

Alexa rank: 95,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Articles about blogging tips, social media, traffic tips, SEO tips, content creation and make money online will stand a good change of getting accepted. Fill in  the contact us form to get your username for login. The minimum word count is 400 words and you’re allowed two links. More information about guest posting can be found here.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  5.45

Alexa rank: 18,000

How to Submit Guest Post:  There are two options for guest writers on this blog. You commit to contributing your guest posts weekly, every other week or monthly. The second option is to pay an insertion fee of $40 to submit your guest post. Read the Guest Posting Series for some tips. Your post must be relevant and benefit bloggers. Read here for the full guest posting guidelines.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  4.76

Alexa rank: 96,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  This blog has an ethical standard to support other blogs. Guest posts must maintain that high quality standard.  Posts must be relevant to blogging, blog tips and social media. Preferences are given to writers who want to make regular contributions. Send an email with your guest post suggestions.

Pagerank:  4

Mozrank:  4.72

Alexa rank: 10,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Register as a guest author on this blog to get an account. Topics of interest include blogging tips, tutorials, WordPress and social media. If you’re unsure about submitting a guest post, read ‘Should you Guest Blog?’ to help you decide. You’re allowed two links in your guest post. Read here for more information about writing for HellBound Bloggers.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  4.36

Alexa rank: 36,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  This blog follows strict guest posting guidelines. Articles should be unique and not published anywhere else on the internet. You’re allowed one link to your blog/website. Submit your guest post by email as a word or text file. Your bio should include a brief introduction about your blog/website.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  4.76

Alexa rank: 28,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  If you want your guest post to be accepted, write about topics that are relevant such as blogging tips, link building, traffic generation, list building SEO, content writing and internet marketing. Content should be original and the minimum word count is 650. You’re allowed two links in your bio. Submit your guest post by email as a .doc attachment. Read here for more information on submission guidelines.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  5.14

Alexa rank:  48,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  This blog is selective about who they accept as guest bloggers. They are looking for quality blogging tips which will be of benefit to their readers. Study content on this blog to familiarize yourself with the types of posts published. These two topics are still to be written, ‘Is Bookmarking Dead’ and ‘Are Blog Networks Still Effective?’ Use the contact us page to submit your guest post. Read the information here before submitting a guest post.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  5.68

Alexa rank:  89,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  Although this blog is about blogging, WordPress, softwares and the web, they’re flexible about guest post content. However, they charge $50 to publish a guest post. You’re encouraged to read  Guest Blogging Gives you What Google Doesn’t. Submit your post via email as a .doc, .docx or txt document for it to be reviewed. Read more about guest post submission here.

Pagerank:  3

Mozrank:  4.81

Alexa rank:  19,000

How to Submit a Guest Post:  If your post is less than 800 words it won’t be considered. Topics should be based on the niche which is blogging, SEO, WordPress, affiliate marketing, traffic tips etc. You’re allowed up to two links. Create an account by registering. You can also email your guest post for review. Read the submit guest post page for more details.

https://www.matthewleffler.com/seo-backlinks-guest-blogging-sites/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=seo-backlinks-guest-blogging-sites

What Is the Best Heatmap Tool and How to Use It to Get Better Results

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heatmap-tool

A heatmap tool allows you to unlock the secrets behind your website users’ behavior.

You’ve heard your friends and associates talking about using a heatmap tool to improve their website conversions and sales. Maybe you’ve even done a little research on the subject. But why exactly do you need a heatmap tool? And what does it do?

You have questions. I have answers.

Here’s the thing: User behavior reports like heatmaps give you information about your target audience that you can’t get anywhere else. Therein lies the value. Without heatmaps, you’re in the dark.

So how do you see the light? Let’s explore heatmap tools and their potential impact on your business.

What Is a Heatmap?

A heatmap is a user behavior report that shows eye tracking and user activity on a particular web page using a color key. In most cases, warmer colors — like red and yellow — indicate lots of activity, while cooler colors indicate little to no activity.

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Check out the heatmap above. It shows lots of activity in the upper left-hand section as well as across the page above the fold. It’s reasonable to deduce that people who visit this site are interested in the primary content that appears first after the logo and navigation bar.

But why is the highest concentration on the left?

It’s likely because people read English from left to right. When you click on a new website, your eye automatically goes to the upper left because that’s how you’d read any other form of media.

What Is the Purpose of a Heatmap Tool?

From a heatmap, you can discern where the highest concentration of activity lies on your website. From that information, you might decide to rearrange your web design, make certain fonts bigger, or adjust your CTAs.

One of the most basic purposes is to figure out where people click the most often. Which links draw the most attention?

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heatmap-tool-purpose

Based on the example above, we know that three specific areas draw more clicks than anywhere else on the page. The website’s owner would want to maximize not only the phrasing and content in those areas, but also the quality of the destination pages.

A great link with optimized anchor text represents just part of the story. You also need to delight the visitor when he or she clicks that link and arrives on another page.

If the destination page doesn’t supply what the user expected, he or she will likely bounce. That’s not good for traffic, conversion, or sales.

How do heatmap tools work?

Heatmap tools use tracking scripts to measure visitor activity on a given page. They calculate movements across the screen as well as clicks to provide a visual representation of user behavior.

That sounds complicated, but fortunately, you don’t have to worry about the engine. You just need to concern yourself with the horsepower — in other words, the output.

When you generate a heatmap for your website, you see the colorful indications on the report. At Crazy Egg, we call this a snapshot.

Each report tells you what users do each time they access your page. We recommend running reports until at least 60,000 people have visited your site. That way, you get a representative map based on lots of users’ activities.

You can then make changes and run further reports to see how your changes impact user behavior. Maybe you get more clicks on your primary CTA, for instance, or perhaps your sales increase because you’ve improved a destination page’s effectiveness.

Why Do You Really Need a Heatmap Tool? (3 Reasons)

Mechanics aside, why should you invest in a heatmap tool?

After all, can’t you just look at your Google Analytics reports to figure out whether people like your site and find it engaging?

The answer is simple: absolutely not.

Google Analytics and similar tools tell you how many clicks a page gets, how long users stay on the page, and other valuable data.

However, they don’t tell you what visitors do on the page itself.

This is critical because user behavior gives you far more insight into what your audience wants. Maybe you’ve included a slam-dunk CTA at the end of your page, but nobody ever scrolls down far enough to see it. A Google Analytics report won’t show that problem.

Beyond that, let’s look at three specific reasons to use a heatmap tool for your website.

Reason 1: Get to Know Your Audience Better

Every entrepreneur starts a business with a general idea of what his or her audience wants, needs, and values. However, experience often changes those perceptions as more insight comes to light.

For instance, let’s say that you sell sporting equipment. Right off the bat, you can make a few deductions about what your target audience wants:

  • High-quality sporting equipment
  • Safe equipment for their chosen sports
  • Access to detailed information about each product
  • A wide range of options in terms of fit, color, and other qualities

As your business ages, your target audience can narrow based on your products and how you market them.

Maybe you target sports enthusiasts who don’t have much disposable income. Consequently, your USP needs to reflect your dedication to providing low-cost products that still get the job done.

Using a heatmap, you can create a report for your sales pages. You might notice that people hover over the “buy” button, but ultimately decide not to click.

Maybe the cost has become a barrier for purchase and you need to either lower the cost or find a less-costly alternative to sell.

Reason 2: Determine the Best Places to Insert Valuable Design Elements

A scroll heatmap looks a little different from a standard heatmap. The color bands go all the way across the page and tell you when users scroll quickly, stop scrolling, or pause to read.

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It uses the same color-coding system to tell you where the most activity lies. You can figure out where you might want to put valuable design elements based on scrolling patterns.

I mentioned above that a great CTA will only result in clicks if your audience sees it. Maybe people stop scrolling about halfway down the page, so they don’t get there.

Moving the CTA farther up the page — ideally to a spot where people often pause to read — can increase your click-through rate and encourage more conversions.

Reason 3: Eliminate Confusion

A heatmap tool can also help you identify areas on your site that might cause confusion among your audience. For instance, in the screenshot below, you’ll see competing CTAs.

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heatmap-tool-eliminate-confusion

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Visitors don’t pay much attention to the content in the body, and people are trying to click on areas that don’t have any links.

All of these activities suggest confusion.

Maybe you’ve underlined a sentence or phrase in your content. People automatically think it’s a link because we’ve been conditioned to conflate underlining with hyperlinks. When the text proves unclickable, users get frustrated.

Additionally, competing CTAs fracture your audience. Some will click on one and others will click on another, but often for no discernable reason. By aligning your CTAs and giving your visitors just one option, you increase harmony on your site.

How to Choose the Best Heatmap Tool [Comparison]

You can evaluate heatmap tools based on many criteria. Focus on the features that matter most to you.

For instance, some heatmap tools don’t offer A/B testing. You can generate heatmap reports on your website, but you can’t automatically test variations against one another to figure out which one performs best among your audience.

Crazy Egg is one example of a heatmap tool that has integrated A/B testing.

Price is another consideration. If a company wants to charge you hundreds of dollars to generate heatmaps from 100,000 visitors, you’re likely paying too much. Sometimes, less-expensive options offer more features.

Pay careful attention to usability, breadth of report options, and related features that might help you evaluate your website more closely. Just because you’re interested in heatmaps now doesn’t mean you won’t want to run recordings later on.

See how the Crazy Egg heatmap tool can help you

Crazy Egg is one of the most popular and intuitive heatmap tools on the market today. We’re trusted by hundreds of high-profile companies, from Dell to Optimizely.

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Our competitors tend to charge more for heatmap reports, but they don’t offer as many options as we do. Our plans start at just $29 per month (billed annually), and permits 20,000 pageviews per month. If you have a larger site, you can upgrade at any time.

Plus, it’s super easy to install. (I’ll get into the specifics in a minute.)

Types of Heatmaps for Websites

Unlike our competitors, we offer five distinct user behavior reports to help you analyze your website and your users’ behavior down to the most granular level.

  1. Heatmaps: We’ve already gone over this type of report. It displays activity on the screen using color intensity and temperature.
  2. Scroll maps: Also called a scroll heatmap, a scroll map uses color intensity and temperature to represent user behavior in terms of scrolling down the page.
  3. Overlay: Find out exactly how many people are clicking on each individual element on your site.
  4. Confetti: Break down the overlay report even further by filtering clicks by referral source and other criteria.
  5. List: View a tab report that breaks down clicks.

Each type serves a specific purpose and helps you to better understand your audience and create website assets.

Step by Step to Generate a Heatmap Online From Your Website

Now that you’re hooked on heatmaps, how do you set them up. On Crazy Egg, it’s as simple as following five easy steps.

Step 1: Sign up for a Crazy Egg Account

If you haven’t already sign up for a Crazy Egg account. You get it free for 30 days so you can try it out and make sure it’s right for you before we bill you.

Once you enter your information, you’ll be taken immediately to a screen that allows you to set up your first snapshot. Remember, in Crazy Egg parlance, a snapshot is a report. Based on the information you enter, the software will generate reports for the specific pages you want to track.

Step 2: Decide How Many Snapshots You Want to Create

As I said, you have two choices when you first enter your Crazy Egg dashboard. You can choose to create multiple snapshots or stick with just one.

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We recommend generating multiple reports. This allows you to run reports on different pages on your site. For instance, you might want to track user behavior on your homepage, main blog page, about page, and landing pages. You can do that from the get-go.

Step 3: Enter the Target URL and Name Your Snapshot(s)

Now it’s time to provide Crazy Egg with some data. You can decide how much information you want to supply and how you want to structure your reports.

Start by entering the target URL — the URL that Crazy Egg will generate reports for — and typing in a name for the report. Consider getting as detailed as possible here.

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Notice that, in this example, I started with the date for the name of the report. That way, I can easily identify when I started the snapshot. I also included the name of the page for this specific report — I used my personal website, NeilPatel.com.

Step 4: Customize Your Snapshots

When you scroll down a bit, you’ll see some more customization options. Specifically, you can decide how you want to handle different types of screens.

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Maybe you’re only interested in gauging user behavior from people who access your website on desktop. You can narrow down the data you collect to that screen size. You can also decide whether you want screenshots taken of the desktop, tablet, or mobile view.

Alternatively, select the option to take three different snapshots, one from desktop, mobile, and tablet. That can offer the most comprehensive data depending on what types of devices your target audience prefers.

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Next, you get to select the reports’ duration. You can enter a custom timeline or use the default.

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There’s detailed information to guide you, and don’t hesitate to visit the help center if you have any questions.

Crazy Egg provides additional customization options. You can use them if you want or leave them in their default positions.

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For instance, you might want to omit all or specific popups, track a certain ratio of visits, delay snapshots from the moment someone lands on your page, or set up custom tracking.

Step 5: Install the Crazy Egg Tracking Script on Your Website

The last step is simple. You can either install the Crazy Egg tracking script yourself or have your web developer handle it for you.

It’s easy enough to do it yourself. Just paste the script into the <head> section of your website.

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Easy peasy.

How to Read and Understand Your Heatmaps

As I mentioned earlier, heatmaps offer a visual representation of user activity. But what does that mean?

It all boils down to numbers, like a ratio. Given a certain number of website viewers, the heatmap tool calculates the intensity of activity on the page based on each individual number’ relationship to the total.

The array is the total number of website visitors. Each visitor represents a value.

Are you following me?

The heatmap tool then converts those numbers into colors based on intensity. You read and understand heatmaps by visually assessing the degree of intensity for each page visit.

Sometimes, you’ll see a ton of information in the basic heatmap form. The intensity might be all over the place.

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how-to-understand-heatmap-tool

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In other cases, you’ll see heatmaps that concentrate intensity in just one or two specific areas. Both results can provide key insights into user behavior.

What kind of data can you get from heatmapping?

The purpose of a heatmap is to tell you how your audience behaves on your website. But what can you do with that data?

You might see lots of click activity on an image on your website. People seem to think it’s a link, but there’s no associated URL.

Adding a link to the image to a relevant page on your site could reduce bounce rate by keeping people on your page for longer periods of time.

Similarly, if there’s little or no activity around your CTA, maybe you need to change the wording or put it in a different place.

That’s what A/B testing is for.

Conclusion

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Data doesn’t have to be daunting.

On the contrary, it shouldn’t be.

I use heatmaps on all my sites to generate valuable data. It’s become part of my optimization process.

Why? Because I don’t want to stare at numbers all day, and I don’t want to rely on Google Analytics or spreadsheets to make decisions about my sites.

Visualization tools make my life easier. They can do the same for you.

Instead, I’d like to know exactly what visitors do when they arrive. That’s what heat maps provide.

Transparent SLIs: See Google Cloud the way your application experiences it

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ClPlBl/~3/HATjLhZVggk/transparent-slis-see-google-cloud-the-way-your-application-experiences-it.html

THE GROWING NEED FOR SEO IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS

About Political SEO

SEO has been around as long as search engines have existed.  We all do know it’s keywords, keywords, keywords? WRONG…if you are in politics stick to that and leave Political SEO up to someone who knows keywords are dead.

It’s going to be a while before we see a political campaign that’s “less digital” than the last one. Budgets keep getting bigger, and investing in online outreach continues to provide candidates with the biggest bang for their buck. But selling voters on politicians and policies isn’t remotely similar to selling, well, anything else.

But SEO is a viable strategy for political campaigns. Politicians (and campaign managers) work hard to “control the message,” which usually means three basic things:

  • Influencing what people say about the candidate. (Sounds a lot like online reputation management!)
  • Making sure the candidate’s views on particular news stories and events get heard. (Sounds like typical “real-time SEO” — ranking for news stories during the news cycle.)
  • Making sure people looking for information on issues and elections find the candidate’s site. (Classic SEO: evergreen content for evergreen keywords.)

Online Reputation Management

Anyone who is partisan enough to get nominated by one party will be disliked by the roughly 50% of the population that leans toward the other party. And they’ll have up days and down days, so there will be times when public opinion is almost universally against them. Which means that political campaigns exist in a state of permanent reputation-management crisis.

For politicians, online reputation management means:

  • Ensuring that their site ranks for their own name. It’s easy enough for Candidate Obama, but not so easy for Candidate Smith.
  • Keeping an eye on Wikipedia — it’s against Wikipedia’s rules to alter your own entry, but it’s fine to tailor on-site content toward addressing Wiki-based critiques.
  • In some cases, politicians may be able to register multiple domains, in order to control the SERP. [name]2012.com, [name]2012volunteers.com, support[name].com etc. could all legitimately work as standalone pages. They might dilute some link equity, but that can be mitigated by using them to deep-link to content on the main site.

Controlling The News Cycle

Political campaigns get into the news and stay there. Even campaigns that are reportedly collapsing poll better than the ones that aren’t reported on at all. But politicians need to invest in SEO in order to influence how stories get reported.

Just look at Herman Cain, for example: Some recent polls cast Cain as the front-runner, and his “9-9-9” tax plan defined a recent debate. But the big story about his tax plan is its similarities to the tax scheme in Sim City. That’s natural; even the most popular politicians are subject to vicious attacks.

What could the Cain campaign do about this? In the pre-Internet world, the right way to handle this kind of controversy is to let it blow over. But the Internet extends the news cycle; the story breaks one day, gets reported and re-reported everywhere the next, and gets searched the week after — which turns a “no comment” into a unanimously negative story.

Instead, the Cain campaign could write its own rebuttal, with a title like, “Did Herman Cain get ‘9-9-9’ from Sim City? No. He got it from his 19-year business career.” (Yes, that’s going to lead to an ellipsis in the SERP. But an ellipsis on the SERP is better than being out of it entirely.)

Rank For Issues — If You Can

Larger, national campaigns may want to target head terms related to specific political issues. It would be a major coup for the Obama website to rank for “unemployment” plus some policy or law-related terms.

That’s a big challenge, since most of the searches for “unemployment,” or “jobs,” “taxes,” “health care” and other such terms, are mostly searches designed to solve associated problems (file for unemployment, find jobs, pay taxes, etc.).

But it’s still possible to do an extended for of online reputation management: Someone is going to rank No. 1 for a term like “Romney health care” or “Obama deficit.” And if Romney and Obama aren’t investing in being No. 1, they’re ceding the terms of the debate to whoever does.

Reposted content from https://searchengineland.com/the-growing-need-for-seo-in-political-campaigns-96953

POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS & SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION

Political Campaigns & Search Engine Optimization

By: Rand Fishkin

Public Relations

The author’s views are entirely his or her own (excluding the unlikely event of hypnosis) and may not always reflect the views of Moz.

Although the topic of political figures (and parties) requiring SEO work had been burning a hole in my head for some time, Wired News has an article from Saturday on just this subject – Pols Hire Web-Savvy Staffers.

Consider Ari Rabin-Havt, 27, who blogs for a living as a staffer to Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, 66. Rabin-Havt’s duties include watching the blogosphere for what’s being said about his boss and others, and helping manage the blog and other web-based activities for Reid.

Rabin-Havt said the way politicians and their staffs view blogs and other internet tools is dramatically different from just two years ago when he was helping Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry of Massachusetts with his internet strategy…

…Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tennessee, responds on a weekly basis to questions on his blog. He also is among several politicians who have recorded podcasts, self-made audio or video broadcasts that can be downloaded from the internet to a computer or portable gadget.

The former heart surgeon who is considering a 2008 presidential bid said he saw the power of podcasts when one in which he discussed avian flu was featured on a conservative blog and downloaded a million times.

Fundamentally, I believe the importance of the online social environment (blogosphere, search sphere, social tagging sphere, etc.) is not only characterized by the numbers (i.e. Frist’s million downloads) but also by influence. The heavily engaged users of these online mediums fit terrifically well into Gladwell’s Tipping Point meme on influencers (below from Wikipedia):

  • Connectors: Those with wide social circles. They are the “hubs” of the human social network and responsible for the small world phenomenon.
  • Mavens are knowledgeable people. While most consumers wouldn’t know if a product were priced above the market rate by, say, 10 percent, mavens would. Bloggers who detect false claims in the media could also be considered mavens.
  • Salesmen are charismatic people with powerful negotiation skills. They exert “soft” influence rather than forceful power. Their source of influence may be the tendency of others, subconsciously, to imitate them rather than techniques of conscious persuasion.

These three groups are all drastically over-represented in audiences at sites like del.icio.us, Digg, Reddit, Techmeme, Wikipedia, YouTube, Technorati and others. If a political campaign can reach these spheres, they can effect recognition, branding and frame the debate – things that political consultants tend to feel are critical to the process of winning an audience.

I’ve talked to a lot of folks in the industry recently about this topic and found that, with one exception, no one had been specifically contacted by a political party, candidate or campaign to help “frame the debate” in the search results. I suspect that’s going to change very soon and we’ll start to see some pretty ugly SEO tactics and heated fights over search results. Although we’ve done “reputation management” style contracts in the past, it’s never been on the political side, where millions of folks would wish to influence the results in favor of their views.

Has anyone ever done SEO in politics? Would you be willing to share your experiences? How do you feel about this might affect the industry (for both SEOs and search engines)?

I think this may be one of several posts on this subject over the next 2.5 years.

Reposted content from https://moz.com/blog/political-campaigns-search-engine-optimization

Political SEO: SEO Tips For Political Campaign Websites

What’s worse than a candidate not having a campaign website? It’s having a campaign website that no one can find. Search engine optimization (SEO) is a way of building your website pages to make them more attractive to search engines and have them rank higher for related searches.

Here are some basic SEO tips when building out your website:

Optimize your site’s web pages

The page title is an important search engine ranking element. The primary keyword or phrase related to the page should be featured at least once in the page title.  For this reason, page title tags in your page HTML should clearly relate to their page. To ensure that your full title tag shows in Google search results, your title should be about 65 characters or less. You can create longer titles, but they may be truncated in the results.

The page title is displayed in the top border of the web browser when a visitor views your website. This serves as an anchor so that the visitor knows where he or she is on your website.  Most web browsers only display the first 95 characters of your title tag. For title tags longer than 95 characters, browsers will simply crop the tag.

The description meta tag is what usually displays as a link description in the search engine results. Create individual meta descriptions for each page. This tag is intended to be a brief and concise summary of your page’s content. If you do not insert a description, the default description in the Site Setup will be used. One or two sentences is best. Anything longer will get truncated by the search engines.

At this point in time, the meta keyword is useless. If you decide to use this meta on your pages, do it properly. Use keywords that are focused specifically for that page. Limit your keywords or keyword phrases to less than five, and be sure that each of the keywords appear somewhere in the copy of the page. But really, just skip the meta keyword tag.

Your pages should contain the critical text necessary for the search engines (and site visitors) to know who you are and what you are running for. This information includes your full location (including state),  primary or election date, contact information and any appropriate disclaimers.

Campaign Website Design

Once your website is completed, you’ll want to create backlinks to your website.

Links are the currency of the web

Links between websites help determine how and what appears in search engine results. The easiest backlinks can come from your campaign’s social media accounts. Make sure your social media profiles are linked back to your website. When you post new content, make sure you mention this in your social media accounts.

Are there local or regional web sites that would agree to link to your site? What about other local candidates and organizations? Are there county and state political blogs that would link to your site? Ask them to put a link from their website to yours, and offer to do the same for them. By trading links, you can both benefit from the cross-traffic and bring exposure to others interested in similar issues.

Related links help build overall relevance, which help web pages rank for related searches.

Create search engine accounts

Creating search engine accounts for your campaign is highly recommended. Many campaigns create a campaign Gmail account as a way to get started. Accounts are free and allow you access to a number of useful services, including AdWords,  Google Analytics, and more. The Google Webmasters site provides detailed information about your site’s visibility on Google, what other sites link to your website, opportunities to diagnose site issues, and information on how visitors arrive at your site.

You can add your site to the Google Webmasters at https://www.google.com/webmasters/ and to Bing at http://www.bing.com/toolbox/webmaster. Don’t submit your website until it is finished and it has officially launched.

With a little work, applying a little SEO to your political campaign website will go a long way to attract more traffic. That means more people to see your message – and potential volunteers and donors.

This is reposted content from https://www.onlinecandidate.com/articles/seo-tips-campaign-websites

Political SEO: Simple search engine optimization techniques for non-profits and political campaigns!

By Laura Packard

Say you’re launching a new political campaign or nonprofit organization. What’s the first way people will try to find you? They’ll usually go to their trusty search engine (most often Google with about 2/3 of the market, Bing being #2) and type in your name. It’s critical that your official website shows up in the first page of results, in the top few choices above the fold if possible. How do you make that magic happen? Here’s some search engine optimization tips that will help you land at the top of the heap.

To step back a bit, Moz has a great in-depth guide to how search engines work and how to optimize your results, and SearchEngineLand has a great guide to seo as well. This post is a much more abbreviated work.

Search engines use several factors to determine the ranking of results, but these are the main ones you can control:

Use keywords in your URL(s)
Use keywords on your pages (both the page title and in headers, as well as content)
Get as many quality links to your site as possible
Tell Google about your site, so that it is completely indexed
Also remember that search engine optimization is a process. There is no magic bullet that will capture you the #1 slot in a day– or ever, on some hot terms. For that, you’re going to need to spend some $ on Google AdWords to get in front of your audience. (This is a good idea anyways for most political campaigns and non-profit organizations, but especially if your search results are not where you want them to be. If you have a 501 c(3) it may even be free! More about Google Grants.)

Your URL

The most important thing you can do at the start is secure a good URL. An ounce of search engine preventative work will save you a pound of trouble later (and keeping your URL out of the hands of your opponents!). Read my previous post on how to successfully launch a political campaign online, there’s lots of tips in there about securing good URLs.

Use keywords in your URL if possible – i.e. your candidate’s full name or organization name (if it isn’t too long) as opposed to just your first or last name or acronym. It’s unclear how heavily Google or Bing weigh this factor, but it certainly can’t hurt. More importantly, it will help people find your site when they just try typing in the name + .com rather than searching. It may be worth buying the long form of your organization name and also the acronym .com/.org/.net etc., and making them all point to the same place.

Secure good URLs using your name or keywords at Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn and Google+ etc. (if relevant) — because these sites will usually have a very good search engine ranking without you needing to do much work. Don’t forget to set the username for your Facebook page, to make the URL shorter and cleaner!

The reason for this is because quality inbound links are such a key factor in search ranking. And which sites have the most inbound links on the web? Sites like Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, New York Times, Politico etc.. Also this is one of the reasons why Rick Santorum is never going to be able to shake his particular unfortunate results.

And finally, make sure you are using permalinks on your site with keywords in them, i.e. your posts look like joesmith.com/why-i-oppose-keystone-xl instead of joesmith.com/?q=27 This is another opportunity to get keywords into the URL itself of pages.

Your Content

Make sure your content is as search engine optimized as possible. There’s a fantastic free plugin for WordPress that we swear by. It makes it easy to determine how your site and individual pages will look to search engines (and when shared via Facebook), by letting you configure the meta description and title for the page. It also lets you solve the common CMS problem of your content showing up with many different urls thanks to categories, tags, and date archives. Google may penalize you for that. Use the LunaMetrics guide for SEOing your WordPress site for more tips. If your site is built in NationBuilder, be sure to configure the SEO settings for each page and for the site as a whole. Here’s a guide for NationBuilder and SEO. Here’s a guide for how to search engine optimize for Drupal, and here’s a guide for Joomla and SEO.

Keep in mind that you want the title, meta description for each page AND the content on the page itself to match up with what people are searching for. So use keywords in the title of the page, and on the page itself (you can even put keywords into alt tags for images), but in a way that makes sense. Everybody’s seen websites that are so keyword heavy that the sentences aren’t even readable anymore. Google is starting to crack down on that kind of blatant keyword packaging, and overdoing can hurt you.

Remember that search engine optimization will bring people to your house. You still want them to come inside, and not scare them away with a wall of unintelligible keyword spam text. So your meta description and text snippets, social media sharing text, should be written in a way that it encourages people to click through to your site. But if it’s misleading or false, people will bounce quickly off your page and Google will penalize you. Make your page descriptions attractive, but accurate.

Quality Links

One of the reasons why I emphasized having your landing page ready when you launch a political campaign so heavily in my previous post is this: when you launch, it’s the one time that newspapers, blogs etc. will link to your site. You need that search engine juice badly in order to do well in search — as previously mentioned, quality inbound links are key.

But say you missed the boat for whatever reason, you launched with no url or a different URL. Then you’ll need to do the hard work of getting as many sites out there as possible to link to you.

Running for office? There are a ton of websites out there that track candidates. Make sure they list your URL. You may have to do a lot of emails initially to make this happen, but it will help over time.

New organization or change of URL? See if you can get other friendly sites to link to you. Also don’t forget if you have an old URL, to redirect it to the new one. You can tell Google (via Webmaster Tools) that your site has moved as well, or when you first launch tell Google to come crawl it (more later on this).

Don’t forget all the places where you can post your own URL. Huffington Post or DailyKos account? You can list a URL on your profile there. You can put a URL on your Twitter profile, on your Facebook page, YouTube channel too. Google+ as well (will cover that in more detail later).

Take advantage of Wikipedia, which naturally will score very high in search. Maybe you or your organization are already listed. If so, make sure your URL is in the external links section. If you’re notable enough but not in wikipedia yet, then have somebody create a page for you. Note that wikipedia has all links as “nofollow”, so it theoretically won’t help you with boosting your own search results. But they are pretty much guaranteed to own one of the top positions on search for your terms, so it’s important your site links are in there so people can find you. Same applies for Facebook/Twitter/YouTube/LinkedIn etc., which may disguise links with their own shorteners etc. but are still how people will look for your site.

Don’t forget about the “quality” part to achieving links. If you get a lot of search engine spam-type emails, these are the folks that use black hat techniques like spamming the content section of websites (or even hacking websites) and packing in paid-for URLs. Google can and will delist you entirely if you use black hat techniques. So, just like buying a questionable email list, DON’T DO IT.

Finally, pay attention to the “anchor text” — the text you use to describe the link on a page. For example this is anchor text. You want to make sure the anchor text for the quality inbound links matches up with how you want the search engines to think about the link itself. This is a good place to utilize keywords you want to rank for. my campaign website is not as good as joe smith for congress campaign website. You have limited control over what other sites use for anchor text, but make sure every link you create has the best possible anchor text. This is critical for how you’ll rate for some keywords.

Tell Google

One of the first things you should do as you launch your site (after you have set up an SEO plugin and/or made the appropriate SEO adjustments to your pages) is to tell Google to come crawl it. There are a few different ways to do this.

Make sure you’re set up in Webmaster Tools. Did you know Google thinks of www.joesmith.com and joesmith.com as two separate sites? You can tell Google in webmaster tools which is the preferred version to use (also make sure your CMS allows you to set one as the canonical version). You can link webmaster tools to Google analytics for the same site, for an even fuller picture of traffic to your site, what search terms are driving people etc. Under the Search Traffic tab, you can also tell which sites link to you (and see what’s missing). Under the Crawl tab (Fetch as Google), you can tell Google to go index your site right now. You can also submit a sitemap to make sure every page is indexed, which can be important if your site design does not easily allow access to every page. Make sure that sitemap is listed in your robots.txt file too.

That brings me to Google+.. Google+ is like a way directly into Google’s brain. If you want something indexed, +1 it or share it on Google+ and it tells Google instantly to go fetch. Also if you +1 content, it will show up higher when the people you are linked to in Google+ do Google searches. So you can manipulate the search results of people that have you in their Google circles. (THESE are the reasons why your site should have a +1 button, and if you like a newspaper article you should +1 it.)

Just because you’re telling Google to crawl your site, doesn’t mean you’ll show up in search results. Be sure to check your robots.txt file, to make sure you are allowing search engines to crawl your site! Read more about robots.txt files.

Google takes into account your site speed in determining your ranking, and also whether the site is mobile optimized (i.e. Mobilegeddon happened in April, where Google started paying attention to this). If you want to keep your supporters happy and engaged, make sure your site loads fast and looks great on mobile devices. If you want to do well in search, that applies just as much. If your site is slow, setting up caching may help. Or it may be time to look at a full website redesign, especially if your site is not achieving your goals and/or is not mobile optimized.

Do all these steps above, and you will eventually rank well for your search terms. Like I said before, unfortunately seo is not an instant process. If you get a bunch of quality inbound links to your website, Google still needs to go out and crawl all those pages over time. Since the age of your site is taken into account by search engines, your search results should improve over time as well.

Reposted content from http://powerthruconsulting.com/blog/search-engine-optimization-fix-bad-search-results/

SEO for Political Campaigns: Strategies for Election Season

MARCH 13, 2016 BY CHARLIE ROSE

Are you running for election?

It’s difficult to create content that resonates with voters, but it’s even more difficult to create content that inspires action.

Considering the number of people who turn online to find information about candidates, SEO is a viable strategy for political campaigns in the digital age.

In the case of search engines, online services such as Google, Yahoo and Bing help voters find information on political candidates writes Journalist Resource.

When you understand your voters, you can understand how to make your campaigns website SEO friendly for registered voters and search engines by optimizing your campaign strategy for success.

In this post, I’m going to show you four different SEO principles and the ways they can help your political campaign.

This blog post will cover:

Reputation Management: Influencing what people say about the candidate.
Real Time Content: Making sure the candidate’s views on particular news stories and events get heard.
Classic SEO: Making sure people looking for information on issues and elections find the candidate’s site.
Competition Research: Checking a rivals website let’s you see every place they’ve shown up on Google: every keyword they’ve bought on Adwords, every organic rank, and every ad variation.
#1: Reputation Management
Cultivate the right social media profiles for your political campaign

A big mistake many political campaigns make is to register social profiles at dozens or hundreds of sites and point links to as many as possible, hoping that some will take over those top rankings.

The general sites I recommend include (in order of effectiveness):

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
YouTube
Instagram
That said, another big mistake is presuming that just registering a profile is enough to be effective.

Like everything else in life – nothing worth having comes easy. Invest in your social profiles and they’ll reward you with controllable front-page real estate in search rankings. But don’t abandon your profiles. Don’t give the appearance of disinterest, lack of resources, or having poor time management skills.

#2: Real Time Content
Further validates the importance of social media
In the first half of 2015, tweets started to be visible in Google’s search results as soon as they’re posted, writes Bloomberg’s Sarah Frier on Feb. 4, 2015.

Googles search results are enhanced by access to real-time tweets and a much broader amount of content. What does this mean for your campaign?

Make Vanity URLs Match
Develop Real Time Mindset
Use #Hashtags
Create Original Content
Update Regularly
Monitor Influences
Real time content should be embraced by any political campaign looking to establish and extend its Web presence.

#3: Classic SEO
Make sure the candidates views can be found

SEO is critical to converting online searchers into prospective voters and supporters.

When prospective voters are looking for information on your campaign, they will start with researching on search engines. If you want to capture that traffic, optimizing your campaigns online presence is essential. Rank for issues…if you can.

In their 2015 study “The Search Engine Manipulation Effect (SEME) and its Possible Impact on the Outcomes of Elections,” Epstein and Robertson found search engine results can affect voter preferences by 20 percent or more. With subjects spending the most time on page one.

What pages should a political campaign website include?

Endorsements
Issues
Candidate bios
Campaign blog
Volunteer
Events
Contribute
#4: Competitive Research
Keep tabs on your political opponents online

It’s helpful for your campaign to do a little competitive research on what rival candidates are generating for search traffic and social engagement. Below are a few spy tools to leverage!

Alexa – shows traffic trends for competing websites.
SpyFu – shows terms that competitors are buying or ranking for in the organic search results.
Compete.com – competitive research tool showing keywords that send competing sites the most traffic.
Majestic SEO – link anchor index that allows you to download the link profile for any site.
Google Traffic Estimator – estimates the number of Google AdWords ad clicks and bid prices for the top ad position.
Followerwonk – helps you explore and grow your social graph.

These are free and paid tools which will help you determine how large a political competitor’s traffic stream is, and which search terms are sending them the most traffic.

Conclusion
Learning more about SEO is a great way to improve your campaigns results.

I’ve shown you 4 principles today that you can use to increase your sales, but there are many more.

This has been reposted from https://www.seomechanic.com/seo-political-campaigns/
Original Title: SEO for Political Campaigns: Strategies for Election Season

These 3 Simple Website A/B Tests Can Help You Save Millions

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Have you ever thought, “If we could increase our traffic by X%, digital marketing would become so much easier”?

If so, don’t worry—you’re not alone.

Many companies choose to funnel a large percentage of their marketing spend into advertising, hoping to scale their business by attracting large numbers of new customers.

Unfortunately, paid customer acquisition has become increasingly competitive and expensive.

Steve Dennis writes for Forbes, “As it turns out, many online brands attract their first tranche of customers relatively inexpensively, through word of mouth or other low cost strategies. Where things start to get ugly is when these brands have to get more aggressive about finding new and somewhat different customers.”

That’s why we love A/B tests that increase website conversions. Why toil away to get more traffic when you can get more out of the traffic you already have?

We ran three simple copy tests and discovered they can make a massive difference in conversion rates.  Since one customer can make a six- or seven-figure difference in the B2B world, conversion rates are a big deal.

Here are three dead-simple conversion rate optimization techniques that moved the needle for us.

1. Aligning Your Ad Copy With the Landing Page

Time and time again, we’ve helped clients by identifying simple mistakes in alignment between ad copy and landing page. It’s a pervasive issue even for established mid-market businesses.

Take a look at this example of fantastic alignment.  The ad copy clearly connects to the messaging on the landing page.  The user is getting exactly what they asked for when they clicked on the ad.

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Many companies assume that they’re missing some advanced, secret technique to succeed. Often, the truth is they simply need a thorough audit to check if they’re following best practices.

For Google AdWords and Facebook ads especially, any incongruence between the messaging in your ad and landing page affects your quality and relevance score:

  1. It reduces the likelihood of your ad showing to prospects
  2. It increases costs
  3. It lowers the landing page conversion rate

A lower score often occurs when a marketer has many keywords or audiences to target. They try to save time by broadly matching these targeted segments with a small number of ads and/or landing pages.

Unfortunately, this generic, and admittedly lazy, approach leads to disjointed messaging on the ad and/or landing page which harms the user experience.

Sometimes, companies even make the mistake of sending users to their home page rather than a landing page.

The problem with this approach is that the messaging is often too broad on the home page, and there are too many distracting elements and links that lower the chances of users taking the action you want.

Here’s an example of this broad marketing approach in practice. Here, the landing page in question is actually the company’s homepage (note the “log in” button).

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Users click the ad looking for the custom attribution modeling the ad is promoting, but they have to scroll halfway down the page to see a snippet about the feature.

Since the user is unlikely to find what they are looking for because it’s buried in a sea of content on the homepage, they are much likelier to bounce quickly than to ever become a lead.

Plus, what a turnoff for organic users.  You hit the homepage, and the first thing you see is a long form!

When AdEspresso sent people to a dedicated landing page rather than their homepage, their cost per conversion dropped by 37%.

A great headline with consistent messaging throughout the marketing funnel can double your conversions overnight. And we have the numbers to prove it.

One client of ours helps veterans get loans. Their ads offered a $10,000 grant and converted well. I mean, who doesn’t love free money? But their performance had room for improvement.

We found the headline on their landing page was different from that of their ad.

When users are unsure whether they have landed on the right page, the likelihood that a user will bounce without converting increases greatly.

The original headline on the landing page read, “Get started with a VA Home Loan Today!”

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In our A/B test, we changed that headline to match the ad headline. Now, both the ad and landing page headline read, “Fill out the form to see if you are eligible for a $10,000 grant!”

This simple headline tweak improved conversion rates by 123%.

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The actionable, effective copywriting tips from this experiment are as follows:

  1. Match your landing page copy with your ad copy, especially the headline. A great offer on an ad is good. But a consistent offer on the ad and landing page is even better.
  2. Make your offer and benefit relevant, valuable, and compelling to your target audience. Entice the visitor with the benefits of your offer, not the features.

2. Show Contact Information Prominently

If users can’t find your contact info in milliseconds, you have a problem. That may seem harsh, but visitors need to find out how to contact you immediately.

They prefer convenience, and sometimes go to your site purely to find out how to reach out to you.

That’s because visitors want to ask questions that will help them decide whether to purchase—or perhaps, they’ve already decided and want to speak with an actual person to close the deal.

With a flurry of competitors your prospect can choose from, confusion or frustration with finding contact info can cost you a customer. Users can be impatient, and they have the luxury to cross choices off their list based on even the slightest friction.

“On many websites the contact information is buried at least five links deep, because the company doesn’t really want to hear from you. And when you find it, it’s a form or an e-mail address.

We take the exact opposite approach. We put our phone number (it’s 800-927-7671, in case you’d like to call) at the top of every single page of our website, because we actually want to talk to our customers. And we staff our call center 24/7.”

-Tony Hsieh, founder of Zappos

Tony said this many years ago, yet if you go to Zappos.com right now, the phone number is still the same and still clear as day in the header of the site. Despite the growth and changes in his company, he’s held true to this claim because he values an excellent customer experience.

Having a clear path to your contact info is mission-critical if you want to boost your conversion rate.

Our client wasn’t receiving enough phone calls through AdWords advertising and SEO. When we looked at their site, it was clear that the phone number was visible but not prominently displayed.

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We didn’t need to do anything sophisticated; we just increased the font size and changed the alignment of the phone number. This small change made the contact information way more visible and decluttered the distracting design.

Here’s what the number looked like after:

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What separates great marketers from mediocre ones? Data-driven testing.

For this example, many marketers would stop here and assume that their change is superior and will produce the best results. But numbers will tell you whether your hypothesis is correct or not.

Even for experienced, successful marketers, what they assume will work better often performs worse. It’s not always their intuition that makes them successful; it’s often their ability to stick with the data.

Calls driven by digital marketing spiked almost immediately after our style changes to the header, and continued to climb weeks after the test went live. If you look at the graphs below, you can see the growth.

We started the test right at the second peak from the left.

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After 30 days, calls increased by 250% compared to the previous 30-day period.

Here’s what you can do to get similar results:

  1. Test adding contact information on the top of your landing and/or home page.
  2. Ask yourself: Can it be bigger? Can it be clearer? Is there a font that’s easier to read? Are the current colors distracting or do they hide the number? If so, make the necessary changes and test for improvement.
  3. Make Your Calls-to-Action (CTAs) Crystal Clear

We tested different copy on a button for another client’s sign-up page. The button initially said, “Sign Up for Interest!”

Interest… in what? As you can tell, the button message was vague and confusing for visitors. It wasn’t clear that clicking the button would subscribe the user to email updates.

And it didn’t mention a magnetic benefit that the user unlocks by converting. Even on large, respected websites, typos and bewildering messaging can show up.

This common mistake opens an excellent opportunity to improve conversion. Review the copy on your website, especially on your most important business-focused pages.

It’s a simple way to spot easy fixes to improve the clarity of your messaging and increase your conversion rate.

The writer of “Sign Up For Interest” was probably trying to convey something more like, “Sign Up If Interested,” but the message got mixed up because he or she was in a rush and didn’t think it through from the user’s perspective.

Hence, we tested new copy that had a clear CTA and benefit. The new button text read, “Sign Up For Exam Updates.”

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The click-through rate (CTR) on the test blew the original out of the water! The CTR increased by 167% with a 99% statistical significance.

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Beyond typos, vague CTAs are still a prevalent issue because digital marketers are unaware of their negative impact.

Clear, benefits-focused CTAs pay dividends.

But because it’s human nature, people tend to naturally word CTAs based on what’s in it for them instead of what’s in it for the people reading the message.

You’ll see this a lot with generic button copy, like “Download” or “Submit,” instead of something more enticing, like “Get 50% Off.” However, this standard approach can leave potential customers yawning.

As Crazy Egg co-founder Neil Patel puts it:

“So, what button copy should you use? Click here, buy now, and order now are a few call-to-action texts that you see around. I’ve found that generic phrasing, like the words above, don’t really impact conversion rates by much.”

In any case, the button leads to the same place—but the message determines whether you get the click and opt-in.

People don’t like “submitting” their information. Place yourself in the shoes of the user, and it’ll make all the difference.

Furthermore, bad execution kills even the best intentions. Messages that seem clear can befuddle the user, and the writer may not even know the effect they’re having on conversions.

Use this simple exercise to avoid user confusion:

Imagine you’re writing for an alien who has never been to earth, or for a foreigner or a child. Ask yourself how you can say what you want to say as quickly, clearly, and obviously as possible.

Successful online businesses are constantly testing and improving their CTAs. HubSpot did a homepage redesign, and one of the three significant changes they made was having one strong, clear CTA rather than multiple hidden, cluttered ones.

This change contributed to a 105.9% increase in conversion rate.

In another study of over 40,000 landing pages, HubSpot found that those with buttons labeled “submit” had a noticeably lower conversion rate. Here is the snapshot of that study, courtesy of HubSpot:

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Here are the key takeaways from this winning story:

  1. Test benefits-focused copy with possessive pronouns for essential conversion points (like “my,” “your,” and “yours”).
  2. Make sure you have a compelling offer and a clear CTA.

Testing button copy or color is often low impact compared to changes you can make with the design, layout, and offer of a landing page.

That’s not to say you should overlook the small elements—in the grander scheme of things, everything matters. But it’s all about prioritizing the most impactful changes first.  

Conclusion

Before we ran a few simple A/B tests, interested prospects slipped away. After plugging those holes with conversion rate analysis, we rescued a lot of dollars.

In summary:

  • The headline test eliminated confusion that made people leave the landing page.
  • The phone number test let more leads know they could call.
  • And the button test captured more prospects who wanted to learn more about the company’s services by making it clear how to do so.

When you have a website optimization strategy, a few tweaks can make a big difference in your conversion rate. And it’s way easier than grinding away to get more traffic.

About the Author


Will Chou is an SEO and copywriting strategist of WebMechanix, the #1 B2B digital marketing agency in the DC/MD/VA area. Discover how simple changes increased registrations by 53% for a client with this free case study.

On GCP, your database your way

When choosing a cloud to host your applications, you want a portfolio of database options—SQL, NoSQL, relational, non-relational, scale up/down, scale in/out, you name it—so you can use the right tool for the job. Google Cloud Platform (GCP) offers a full complement of managed database services to address a variety of workload needs, and of course, you can run your own database in Google Compute Engine or Kubernetes Engine if you prefer.

Today, we’re introducing some new database features along with partnerships, beta news and other improvements that can help you get the most out of your databases for your business.

Here’s what we’re announcing today:

  • Oracle workloads can now be brought to GCP
  • SAP HANA workloads can run on GCP persistent-memory VMs
  • Cloud Firestore launching for all users developing cloud-native apps
  • Regional replication, visualization tool available for Cloud Bigtable
  • Cloud Spanner updates, by popular demand

Managing Oracle workloads with Google partners

Until now, it’s been a challenge for customers to bring some of the most common workloads to GCP. Today, we’re excited to announce that we are partnering with managed service providers (MSPs) to provide a fully managed service for Oracle workloads for GCP customers. Partner-managed services like this unlock the ability to run Oracle workloads and take advantage of the rest of the GCP platform. You can run your Oracle workloads on dedicated hardware and you can connect the applications you’re running on GCP.

By partnering with a trusted managed service provider, we can offer fully managed services for Oracle workloads with the same advantages as GCP services. You can select the offering that meets your requirements, as well as use your existing investment in Oracle software licenses.

We are excited to open the doors to customers and partners whose technical requirements do not fit neatly into the public cloud. By working with partners, you’ll have the option to move these workloads to GCP and take advantage of the benefits of not having to manage hardware and software. Learn more about managing your Oracle workloads with Google partners, available this fall.

Partnering with Intel and SAP

This week we announced our collaboration with Intel and SAP to offer Compute Engine virtual machines backed by the upcoming Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory for SAP HANA workloads. Google Compute Engine VMs with this Intel Optane DC persistent memory will offer higher overall memory capacity and lower cost compared to instances with only dynamic random-access memory (DRAM). Google Cloud instances on Intel Optane DC Persistent Memory for SAP HANA and other in-memory database workloads will soon be available through an early access program. To learn more, sign up here.

We’re also continuing to scale our instance size roadmap for SAP HANA production workloads. With 4TB machine types now in general availability, we’re working on new virtual machines that support 12TB of memory by next summer, and 18TB of memory by the end of 2019.

Accelerate app development with Cloud Firestore

For app developers, Cloud Firestore brings the ability to easily store and sync app data at global scale. Today, we’re announcing that we’ll soon expand the availability of the Cloud Firestore beta to more users by bringing the UI to the GCP console. Cloud Firestore is a serverless, NoSQL document database that simplifies storing, syncing and querying data for your cloud-native apps at global scale. Its client libraries provide live synchronization and offline support, while its security features and integrations with Firebase and GCP accelerate building truly serverless apps.

We’re also announcing that Cloud Firestore will support Datastore Mode in the coming weeks. Cloud Firestore, currently available in beta, is the next generation of Cloud Datastore, and offers compatibility with the Datastore API and existing client libraries. With the newly introduced Datastore mode on Cloud Firestore, you don’t need to make any changes to your existing Datastore apps to take advantage of the added benefits of Cloud Firestore. After general availability of Cloud Firestore, we will transparently live-migrate your apps to the Cloud Firestore backend, and you’ll see better performance right away, for the same pricing you have now, with the added benefit of always being strongly consistent. It’ll be a simple, no-downtime upgrade. Read more here about Cloud Firestore.

Simplicity, speed and replication with Cloud Bigtable

For your analytical and operational workloads, an excellent option is Google Cloud Bigtable, a high-throughput, low-latency, and massively scalable NoSQL database. Today, we are announcing that regional replication is generally available. You can easily replicate your Cloud Bigtable data set asynchronously across zones within a GCP region, for additional read throughput, higher durability and resilience in the face of zonal failures. Get more information about regional replication for Cloud Bigtable.

Additionally, we are announcing the beta version of Key Visualizer, a visualization tool for Cloud Bigtable key access patterns. Key Visualizer helps debug performance issues due to unbalanced access patterns across the key space, or single rows that are too large or receiving too much read or write activity. With Key Visualizer, you get a heat map visualization of access patterns over time, along with the ability to zoom into specific key or time ranges, or select a specific row to find the full row key ID that’s responsible for a hotspot. Key Visualizer is automatically enabled for Cloud Bigtable clusters with sufficient data or activity, and does not affect Cloud Bigtable cluster performance. Learn more about using Key Visualizer on our website.

Key Visualizer, now in beta, shows an access pattern heat map so you can debug performance issues in Cloud Bigtable.

Finally, we launched client libraries for Node.js (beta) and C# (beta) this month. We will continue working to provide stronger language support for Cloud Bigtable, and look forward to launching Python (beta), C++ (beta), native Java (beta), Ruby (alpha) and PHP (alpha) client libraries in the coming months. Learn more about Cloud Bigtable client libraries.

Cloud Spanner updates, by popular request

Last year, we launched our Cloud Spanner database, and we’ve already seen customers do proof-of-concept trials and deploy business-critical apps to take advantage of Cloud Spanner’s benefits, which include simplified database administration and management, strong global consistency, and industry-leading SLAs.

Today we’re announcing a number of new updates to Cloud Spanner that our customers have requested. First, we recently announced the general availability of import/export functionality. With this new feature, you can move your data using Apache Avro files, which are transferred with our recently released Apache Beam-based Cloud Dataflow connector. This feature makes Cloud Spanner easier to use for a number of important use cases such as disaster recovery, analytics ingestion, testing and more.

We are also previewing data manipulation language (DML) for Cloud Spanner to make it easier to reuse existing code and tool chains. In addition, you’ll see introspection improvements with Top-N Query Statistics support to help database admins tune performance. DML (in the API as well as in the JDBC driver), and Top-N Query Stats will be released for Cloud Spanner later this year.

Your cloud data is essential to whatever type of app you’re building with GCP. You’ve now got more options than ever when picking the database to power your business.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ClPlBl/~3/2b3Lx6_XeXc/on-gcp-your-database-your-way.html

Announcing resource-based pricing for Google Compute Engine

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ClPlBl/~3/ysTBUNeKjzw/announcing-resource-based-pricing-for-google-compute-engine.html

How to Get Traffic to Your Website (Neil Patel’s Ultimate Guide)

how-to-get-traffic-website

how-to-get-traffic-website


how-to-get-traffic-website

how-to-get-traffic-website

I don’t think anyone would argue that I’ve written a ton of content over the years about how to get traffic to your website. Still, it’s one of the most important skills to learn.

Optimizing your website for conversions won’t matter if you don’t have any traffic to begin with. It’s like expecting to sell merchandise when nobody visits your brick-and-mortar store.

Once you know how to get traffic to your website, you can optimize your content and pages based on patterns among your target audience. That’s step two. But as they say, you have to walk before you can run.

Following is my ultimate guide on how to get traffic to your website. It’s based on lots of content I’ve written on my personal blog as well as new insights I’ve developed since writing that content.

I urge you to read every word, especially if your Google Analytics account suggests that your website is pretty much a ghost town. It’s time to drive more traffic to your site so you can convert those visitors on your amazing offer.

The Importance Of Bringing Traffic to Your Website

Only a small portion of your overall web traffic will convert on your offers. For reference, I have an exit intent on my personal website where visitors can sign up for my email list in exchange for a lead magnet. My conversion rate is about 7.5 percent — that’s very good.

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how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-importance


how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-importance

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-importance

Your visitors might convert at just 1 percent or 3 percent. That paints your web traffic in a whole new light, doesn’t it?

How can I Check the Traffic on my Website?

It’s impossible to know where you stand unless you’re tracking traffic to your website. I recommend Google Analytics. It’s free, easy to use, and quick to access.

checking-how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website

checking-how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website


checking-how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website

checking-how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website

You’ll see a graph, a pie chart, and specific numbers, such as the number of users, new users, and sessions. You want your traffic to go up over time, though you’ll experience short-term fluctuations based on many different factors.

For instance, you might struggle to generate traffic during the holiday season. Unless you sell holiday-related products or services, you won’t entice people as much.

Year over year, however, you want your web traffic to go up. But how do you learn how to get traffic to your website?

How to Get Traffic to Your Website (Neil Patel’s Ultimate Guide)

If you want to know how to get traffic to your website, I have many strategies to share, all based on previous posts I’ve written. Read through all of them so you’re fully equipped with the strategies necessary to grow your traffic.

Increase Traffic to Your Website With These 18 Unusual Tactics

Sometimes, you need to think out of the box to increase traffic to your website. You might already know most of the basics, but I shared 18 new, improved, or special tactics that can have an immediate impact on your total web traffic.

From creating a thank-you page that highlights other companies and people to writing a response post to someone else’s article, these tactics help you build your reputation and your search engine rankings.

Use other popular sites, such as Quora and Medium, to attract more traffic, or consider adding custom links to your business cards. The more creative you get, the more popular your content will become.

7 Proven Strategies to Increase Your Blog’s Traffic by 206%

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-strategies

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-strategies


how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-strategies

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-strategies

If there’s one thing I know how to do, it’s how to get traffic to your website. I don’t just parrot tips and strategies to my audience. I prove my expertise through real numbers.

For example, Crazy Egg’s traffic jumped by 206 percent after we implemented seven simple strategies.

I go into detail about the smaller tactics, such as creating better headlines and leveraging traffic from other sources, but you’ll also benefit from the high-level strategies that frame this post. Use it to experience a quick, massive traffic jump on your site.

What Should You Do If You Have a “Great” Article That’s Getting 0 Traffic?

There are few things more frustrating to a marketer or business owner than writing a spectacular article that never gains traffic. It might be the best piece of prose since “War and Peace,” but nobody’s looking at it.

If you’re getting no traffic to an incredible post, you need to figure out how to point people in the article’s direction.

Aggressively promote your content to anyone who might have an interest in it.

You might also want to cross-post it on other sites. LinkedIn and Medium can become fantastic sources of traffic if you build your following on those sites.

How to Increase Your Website Traffic Without SEO

I know I’m always harping about SEO, but believe it or not, you can figure out how to get traffic to your website even if you don’t have any SEO strategy. You just have to get a little more creative.

Advertising and social media offer the top two ways to generate more traffic without SEO in place. If you can get eyes on your content, you’ll have accomplished the first hurdle of lead generation, and as word of mouth spreads, your traffic will grow.

How to Grow Your Blog to 100,000 Visits a Month Within 1.5 Years

You might already know this if you’re familiar with my work, but I grew Crazy Egg to 100,000 visitors per month in just 18 months. That’s a shorter time frame than with either Quicksprout or KISSmetrics.

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-or-blog

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-or-blog


how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-or-blog

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-or-blog

In my article on the topic, I talk about how I leveraged what I’d learned through years of content marketing to speed up traffic growth. From writing in a conversational tone to bulking up social media, there are plenty of ways to get more clicks on your content.

Fortunately, you don’t have to struggle with guess-and-check strategies for years like I did. You can just follow my blueprint.

Brand New Blog. No Traffic. Here’s What to Do

It’s tough to start a blog from scratch with no traffic. In fact, it’s terrifying.

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If you’re brand new, you have to seek attention wherever you go. Create extremely clickable headlines, sharey our content widely on social, run a contest or giveaway, and consider working with influencers.

Traffic won’t appear just because you launch a blog. You have to hustle for it.

By that, I mean you need to get the word out to anyone who will listen. Build your email list, expand to other social platforms, and work on your content and imagery.

How to Do SEO for a “Tiny” Website That Doesn’t Have Any Visitors or Money

No money? No visitors? No problem.

Here’s the deal: Everybody starts with a tiny website that doesn’t have any visitors. Many of those people start with no money, too. That doesn’t mean you can’t get your fair share of traffic.

Start with a content strategy. Create content that resonates with your audience and provides real value.

Instead of relying on ads — because you’re short on cash — you’ll do legwork instead. Promote your content to people who regularly share information in your industry.

You might even offer a free product or service demo to a few influencers. If even one takes you up on it, you can get free advertising and tons of traffic.

Hack Your Way to 50,000 Google Visitors with These 9 Tips

Sometimes marketers forget that traffic itself isn’t valuable. You can have 100,000 visitors every month and never make a single dollar.

If you just want the bragging rights, that’s fine. But if you’re trying to make money, you need a better strategy.

SEO is beneficial only when you reach the right traffic. The same goes for paid social, paid search, and other traffic-generation strategies. That’s why I talk all the time about how to hack your way to more (and better) Google traffic.

Your Best Year Ever: How To Drive 20,000 Visitors To Your Blog In 90 Days

If those numbers sound impossible, think again. I recommend focusing on outreach as much as traditional SEO if you want to hit big numbers and accrue sustained traffic.

Reach out to magazines and influencers. Post information on Yahoo! Answers and Quora. At the same time, drill down on the basics. Make sure your metadata is fully filled out — and accurate — and that you’re targeting long-tail keywords with in-depth content. Those are some of the best ways to drive more visitors to your blog in a short period of time.

60,000 Visitors and Counting: How to Double Your Traffic With Infographics

Infographics are all the rage, and for good reason. They’re great for driving traffic, but only if you create high-quality, relevant content.

Think of an infographic as a condensed, illustrated blog post. That’s how valuable it needs to be. If you’re just throwing numbers on a pretty picture, you won’t get traffic to your website.

To grow your traffic with infographics, focus on topics that interest your audience, illustrations that resonate with the topic, and distribution channels that get your infographic seen by as many people as possible.

3 Steps to Driving More Website Traffic By Repurposing Your Blog Content

You’ve written a blog post. It gets decent traffic. People have left positive comments on it and shared it on social.

What next?

Repurpose your blog content.

Turn older content into infographics, videos, podcasts, webinars, or any other format that your audience might want to consume. You can rearrange the content and update any statistics, but the project will take far less work than if you were to create new content from scratch.

5 Tools That’ll Help You Drive Traffic to Your Website | Search Engine Optimization Tips

I love tools. They make my life easier, allow me to pinpoint the best ways to reach my audience, and reduce the number of spreadsheets I have to create.

Who’s with me?

In this video, I share five tools that will help you get traffic to your website. I’ll give you a hint: the first one is Ahrefs.

3 Tips to Driving More Visitors Back to Your Website

Sometimes, it’s not about attracting new traffic. You want previous visitors to return.

How do you accomplish that? You serve up the best possible content.

I go into even more detail in the following video, which will teach you how to convince your audience to keep coming back for more content.

https://youtu.be/vw-qxadXojk

How To Get More Organic Traffic With Quora

I mentioned Quora above, but I want to make clear how valuable this resource can become. You just have to approach it strategically.

Many of the people on Quora type up off-the-cuff answers to questions. They don’t provide any detail or meaty advice.

If you up the ante with thoughtful, original answers to questions, you’ll get upvoted. That results in exposure.

Avoid shoving links into your Quora answers unless they’re vital for context. Instead, concentrate on building brand recognition. Traffic will follow.

How to Drive Even More Traffic to Your Top Performing Posts

Over time, traffic often fades even on your top-performing posts. They’re older, so Google doesn’t rank them as highly, and they’re not as visible on your blog.

You can remedy that in no time and get a fresh surge in traffic. All you have to do is revisit your top-performing posts.

If you have an existing blog with lots of content, focus on driving traffic back to those top-performing posts. Insert links to those posts in your new content, refresh the older content, or even republish the best posts. Remember to update any outdated statistics or information.

SEO Tools that Can Help You Get More Traffic to your Website

Learning how to get traffic to your website can prove daunting, especially if you’re in a small niche or you have no experience with marketing. Following are a few tools to help you get a jumpstart on the journey.

Driving Traffic to Your Online Business

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how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website-neil

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Would you like to learn how to get more traffic directly from me? Sign up for my online course through Creative Live. I’ll teach you how to leverage your skills and talents to make your site more popular.

The course comes with 10 HD videos as well as bonus content. Plus, there’s a money-back guarantee.

21 Resources For Mastering Online Marketing

Everyone loves roundup posts, right? If you want to master online marketing and generate the best possible results from your content, you need effective resources.

From SEMrush to page speed reports, these 21 resources offer plenty of value.

Seo Analyzer

The best tools in life are free.

Check out my SEO Analyzer, which will give you detailed information about your website and its performance in the search engines. It will analyze your page speed, keywords, errors, and more.

Ubersuggest – Keyword ideas

You might have heard that I recently acquired Ubersuggest. I’m currently revamping it to include tons of extra data, so stay tuned.

In the meantime, it’s an incredibly useful tool for finding related keywords, determining how much keywords costs per click, and more. You can use it to generate blog post ideas, for instance, so you can rank for a keyword in search and generate more traffic.

After Getting Traffic, You Need to Get Conversions

Figuring out how to get traffic to your website is just step one, right? Once you’re generating reliable traffic, start focusing on conversions.

Use Crazy Egg to analyze your existing traffic. User behavior reports can show you what headlines, images, CTAs, and other elements on the page attract the most eyes and clicks. You can also study scroll maps to figure out when people become disinterested with your content — or when they pause to read your work more carefully.

Then it’s time to A/B test your pages. What headline works best on your audience? What about the CTA? How can you rearrange the page to make it more inviting to your audience? Focus on the biggest and most important pages first: landing pages and sales pages.

You can also harness existing traffic to get conversions with Hello Bar. Use an exit popup, such as the one on my site, to stop people before they leave. Invite them to join your mailing list with an enticing lead magnet.

Conclusion

It’s hard to get traffic to your website. If you’re struggling, you’re not alone.

That’s why I put together this guide. I want to help as many people as possible harness their knowledge and attract people to their sites.

It starts with SEO, social media, great content, and outreach. Use valuable tools to help you figure out what type of content to put on your site and to analyze the traffic when it comes.

Sure, you want to optimize your site for conversions. However, that’s putting the cart before the horse if you don’t have any traffic for which to optimize. Remember: Baby steps.

The Future of SEO: It’s Not What You’re Expecting

future of seo

future of seo


future of seo

future of seo

What do you think the future of SEO is?

And no, I am not talking about what Google will look like 10 years from now… I’m talking about how you’ll be able to rank your site in the future.

You know, that one thing that’ll just skyrocket your rankings.

So, what do you think it is?

I can tell you this… it’s not link building and it’s not on-page SEO.

Sure, those things help, but they don’t skyrocket your rankings. When you build links, it can take months if not a year for them to kick in.

And everyone is doing on-page SEO, so there is nothing unique about it anymore.

So, what do you think it is? Shall I give you a hint?

The accidental SEO hack

I stumbled on the “future” of SEO by accident. Back in March 2016, I was able to take my traffic from 185,980 visitors a month to 195,596 a month.

And it all happened within 30 days.

Here was my traffic in February 2016:

feb traffic

feb traffic


feb traffic

feb traffic

After I ran my accidental marketing experiment, my traffic grew by 9,616 visitors (to 195,596 monthly visitors in March).

mar 2016

mar 2016


mar 2016

mar 2016

I know what you are thinking… there are more days in March than February. And although that’s true, the majority of those additional 9,616 visitors came from search.

So what happened?

As I mentioned above, I accidentally stumbled upon this.

But once I noticed that the side effect of this marketing experiment was that it increased my search traffic, I ran it again.

And this time, on a much larger scale.

Let’s look at my traffic in June 2016:

june traffic

june traffic


june traffic

june traffic

And now let’s look at July 2016:

july traffic

july traffic


july traffic

july traffic

And now look at August 2016:

august traffic

august traffic


august traffic

august traffic

That growth rate is ridiculous! I grew my traffic to 454,382 visitors a month in August from 240,839 in June!

See, during that time period, I wasn’t trying to figure out any cool SEO hacks that would boost my rankings… it just accidentally happened. And it happened because I was running a marketing experiment that wasn’t related to SEO, but funny enough, it impacted SEO (in a major way!).

As you can see from the graphs above, I was able to drastically boost my rankings and search traffic over time.

So, can you guess what it was?

Let me give you a hint…

How Google deals with the Internet cesspool

The EX-CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt, talked about how the Internet is becoming a place where false information is thriving. Essentially, the Internet is becoming a cesspool.

He went on to discuss how brands were becoming more important signals whether or not content can be trusted.

And in his words:

Brands are the solution, not the problem. Brands are how you sort out the cesspool.

In other words, if you want to do well in the long run, you have to build a brand.

When you look at Google you can see clearly that it’s dominated by big brands. From Huffington Post to Wikipedia to CNN… the list goes on and on.

Sure, these sites have a lot of content and backlinks, but they also have huge brands.

When my traffic grew from 185,980 visitors a month in February 2016 to 454,382 visitors in August, it was due to one thing.

My brand kept growing!

Just look at the brand queries for my name over time according to Google Trends:

google trends

google trends


google trends

google trends

Over time, my brand has grown in popularity. And as it’s grown, so has my traffic.

In the last 28 days, 40,412 people found my site by Googling variations of my name.

search console

search console


search console

search console

That’s a lot of people!

But what’s cool is, the traffic increases didn’t mainly come from people Googling “Neil Patel.” It mainly came from an increase in rankings for non-branded terms like “online marketing.”

It’s so effective that I generate over a million visits from Google each month now:

google traffic

google traffic


google traffic

google traffic

To clarify, the way Google looks at brands is that if a website gets a higher amount of brand queries than their competition (the number of people searching for your website name each month), it tells Google that people prefer that one brand over another.

And when Google is determining where to rank a website for all of the terms they are optimizing for, they give more preference to the ones with the most popular brands because those are the sites that people prefer more.

So why does Google put so much emphasis on brands verus other search signals?

Why Google loves brands

Just think about it, it’s the hardest thing to manipulate.

You optimize your on-page code with very little effort these days.

Heck, if you have a WordPress blog you can just use the Yoast SEO plugin and it will do a lot of the work for you.

And when it comes to links, it is harder, but not impossible. You can do email outreach, guest posting, buying links, reciprocal link building, content marketing

Now, I am not saying you should leverage all of these link building tactics because Google frowns upon many of them and they are short-sighted (always think long-term).

You get the point… it’s not that hard to build links these days if you know what you are doing.

But the one thing that is hard to build, no matter how good of a marketer you are, is a brand.

Even if you do massive PR stunts, which causes everyone to know your brand and search for your brand on Google (that’s how they measure it), it won’t help you in the long term.

And trust me, I’ve tried it all.

I even tried to get people to search for my name by having famous people hold up signs with my name as it causes others to wonder “who is Neil Patel” and perform a Google search. I also did that throughout the world in different languages.

I even had Larissa Manoela, a famous Brazilian actress, post this on her Instagram account for her 15+ million (million!!) followers.

who is neil patel

who is neil patel


who is neil patel

who is neil patel

The concept behind this marketing stunt was that no matter what industry you are in, everyone follows celebrities (or at least knows about them). And if you can get these celebrities to talk about you, it will create buzz and get new people to learn who you are and potentially become an avid follower. Or at the very least, search for you in Google.

And if you can get a lot of celebrities (or social influencers) to talk about you during the same time, it will create even more buzz and potentially cause newspapers and news websites to talk about you as well.

Now I didn’t have enough money to pay A-list celebrities, so I took Internet celebrities (and a few big names in countries outside of the US) and got them to hold up signs with my name on both Facebook and Instagram.

This created buzz, which then caused more people to Google my name. This, in turn, increased my popularity over time. And the end result was that I increased my rankings for non-branded terms (like “online marketing” and “SEO”).

That’s how I got the big boost in traffic from February 2016 to August 2016.

Although that will help boost your search traffic in the short run, it won’t last long unless you continually build up your brand. Google is looking to see how many people are searching for your brand name on a daily basis… and ideally, they want to see this increase over time.

In other words, if you can’t maintain your brand’s popularity, your search traffic will die off if you use short-term strategies as I did. That’s why you see huge spikes in my brand when you look at the Google Trends image below.

google trends

google trends


google trends

google trends

But if your brand continues to grow in popularity, so will your search traffic for all of your non-brand related terms.

It’s hard to see it in the chart above, but before I focused on building my brand, I was only generating 18,304 brand queries per month, versus 40,412 that I am generating now.

So how do you build a brand?

As I mentioned above, you need people searching for your brand name on a consistent basis.

The only way to really do this is by creating value.

Just look at me… I blog on a regular basis, produce educational videos, I have a daily podcast, and I even speak at conferences.

All in all, it has caused my brand to grow over the years.

And this works even better for corporations. If you create an amazing product or service, people will love your brand and keep coming back.

I learned this from my Ubersuggest acquisition. When I bought the brand and merged it into my website, my number one search query become the term “Ubersuggest” and variations of it.

most popular term

most popular term


most popular term

most popular term

People love the tool… so much so that they access it by Googling the brand name. Sure, the tool has more direct traffic, but people also go to sites using Google.

But to get back to the question of how you can build a brand?

Well, there are no very detailed strategies I can give you as it will range from business to business. I can give you an overview of strategies that have worked for me though, as well as some stats to go along with it:

Blog weekly

I’ve found that if you blog on a regular basis you get more brand queries.

When people are expecting content from you on a regular basis, they’ll Google your brand to come back to your blog and read your latest content.

When I blogged daily, I generated 11% more brand queries than when I blogged once a week. This is why sites like CNN, Huffington Post, Business Insider, and every other news site generates a lot of brand queries… they blog numerous times per day.

Create videos

You don’t have to copy my YouTube strategy, but you should create some sort of videos related to your product, service, or industry. Not because of Google or YouTube, but because of social networks like Facebook and LinkedIn love video content.

So much so that it’s easier to get eyeballs on Facebook and LinkedIn for video content than it is on YouTube.

This will cause more people to see your brand, and build a relationship with you or your company.

What I’ve found is that the more videos I create the more brand queries I get. Just look at the screenshot below:

youtube brand queries

youtube brand queries


youtube brand queries

youtube brand queries

The screenshot shows how many views my videos received on YouTube over the last 28 days from people searching for my name. It’s 3,806 visitors to be exact.

I know YouTube brand queries doesn’t mean more brand queries on “Google.”

But if you can push out video content on YouTube, Facebook, and LinkedIn, it can’t hurt. It will cause more people to see your brand, and eventually, this should cause more people to Google you.

Now, the reason I am emphasizing LinkedIn and Facebook is that it is easier to generate views on those two social networks for video content. I know they count views differently, but there is a huge difference (and even if there weren’t, it’s extra views).

Just look at my YouTube views for my video on GoogleRank Brain, it has 10,010 views:

rankbrain youtube

rankbrain youtube


rankbrain youtube

rankbrain youtube

And on Facebook it has 31,000 views:

facebook rankbrain

facebook rankbrain


facebook rankbrain

facebook rankbrain

And on LinkedIn it has 29,506 views:

rankbrain views

rankbrain views


rankbrain views

rankbrain views

So if YouTube is creating roughly 3,806 brand queries per month when it’s generating fewer views than Facebook and LinkedIn, just imagine what these videos are doing for my brand.

Sadly, Facebook and LinkedIn don’t share stats in the same way as YouTube, but you can come to the conclusion that it probably helps in a similar fashion.

That’s why you need to create videos in order to promote your personal or corporate brand on all social sites (you can use the same content, just upload it to each social network).

Speak at conferences

Every time I speak at conferences I see an influx of brand queries.

It’s harder for me to see these days as I already have a lot of brand queries, but I used to see big swings in my brand queries when I was starting out because of my participation at conferences.

Every time I spoke at a conference with at least 300 attendees (the number of people attending your speech, not the total number of people registered for the event), I would see an increase in brand searches within 24 to 48 hours of my talk.

Each speech would typically bring me 110 to 180 extra brand queries. Although that seems high, you have to keep in mind that reporters also sit in on speeches and are blogging about your speech. This creates more press related to you and your company, which helps with brand queries.

And if the conference you are speaking at uploads the video of your speech to YouTube (or even live streams the event on Facebook) you’ll see even more brand queries.

The larger the audience the better as it creates more potential searches. If you don’t know how to get speaking spots, check this out.

And if you don’t have the time to travel, you can speak at virtual events. They won’t have the same effect, but it is better than nothing.

Build an amazing product or service

I learned this one from my Ubersuggest acquisition… if people love what you are building, your brand queries will really skyrocket. It’s so effective, that it has become my new SEO strategy.

ubersuggest google trends

ubersuggest google trends


ubersuggest google trends

ubersuggest google trends

As you can see, the better product you build, the more brand queries you’ll receive.

With Ubersuggest I took a simple approach, just take what my competitors are charging for and give it away for free.

And my brand queries don’t even compare to companies like Dropbox, Apple, Slack, and the loads of other companies that have built amazing products or service.

This strategy is easy to replicate and you’ll see the results fast as long as you take what your competition is charging for and give it away for free.

Just look at the chart above: it shows a huge spike in just 1 month. That was when I released more features for free.

Performance-based press

There are companies like PRserve that charge for performance-based press. If they get you press, you then pay. If not, you don’t pay a dime. It won’t cause tons of brand queries at first, but over time it will help.

If you want to do it yourself, here is an article I wrote breaking down how to get press. It takes longer and it’s harder than hiring someone, but as long as you are willing to put in the time, you will see results.

You can also check out sites like Help a Reporter Out, where journalists ask questions and people go to help them out. When you see a question related to your expertise or industry, you should respond and you can get free press.

Release a book

This works better for personal brands, but publishing a book is a great way to get more brand queries. There are even companies that can streamline the whole process for you.

When I released my book Hustle, I learned three important things:

  1. Don’t co-author a book – I love my co-authors, but I would have received much more of a brand boost if I self-authored the book.
  2. Write a book about your expertise – Hustle was a mainstream book that appealed to most people versus people who wanted to learn about marketing. If I wrote a book about marketing, which is where my expertise is, I believe my brand would have grown faster (even if fewer people purchased the book).
  3. Don’t focus on being a New York Times Bestselling author – I was on the list 3 weeks in a row, and I don’t think it did much for me. Focus on building a following within your space, versus just generating book sales from people who don’t care about your business.

Hopefully, the strategies above will give you a start on building your brand… it just takes time and a lot of elbow grease.

There is no quick solution and what worked for me may not work for you. So get your creative juices flowing and think outside the box.

Conclusion

Branding may seem like a waste of money, but it isn’t.

I used to think companies like Nike were wasting money with all of their TV ads when they could have focused on channels that produced a direct ROI like Google Ads.

But what’s funny is, when you think of shoes you naturally think of “Nike.” You don’t have to Google them, you just know about them because they’ve built a huge brand and are everywhere.

Same goes for Visa. When you think of credit cards, Visa comes to mind because they are accepted worldwide and run tons of ads.

The list keeps going on and on… from McDonald’s to Coca-Cola… the one thing you have to learn from these big companies is that you have to build an amazing brand. Not only will it create more brand searches, but it will help drive more revenue in the long-run.

Most of the companies I mentioned above don’t generate the majority of their sales from Google… they generate their sales from having a huge brand that people trust and love. The brand queries that they get on Google is just an added benefit.

And if that doesn’t convince you, here is an interesting stat. One of my friends works for one of the largest travel companies in the world. They are publicly traded and run television ads as well as spending millions on Google/Facebook ads each month.

When they run TV ads, their Google cost per click (CPC) goes down by roughly 20% because people are seeing their brand everywhere and are more willing to click on it. When they turn off the TV ads, they see the CPCs go back up.

They also own so many travel sites in the space, so they tested this out with a handful of them. Every time they saw similar results, no matter which travel site they tested it on.

More money spent on branding equals a cheaper CPC. When they don’t run TV ads, CPCs go up.

I know you probably don’t like the idea of branding because it isn’t something that is instant, and it is hard to manipulate. But that’s why creating a strong brand drastically increase your non-branded rankings.

So, what are you waiting for… are you going to focus on building a brand?